hyperbilirubinemia


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hyperbilirubinemia

[¦hī·pər‚bil·ə‚rü·bə′nē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Excessive amounts of bilirubin in the blood.
A severe, prolonged physiologic jaundice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sickle cell disease, extreme hyperbilirubinemia, and pericardial tamponade: case report and review of the literature.
Hyperbilirubinemia is an independent risk factor for increased mortality.
A In 2004, the American Academy of Pediatrics established a practice guideline for the determination of hyperbilirubinemia in term infants.
Clinical and laboratory manifestations of three patients with concomitant malignancies Clinical/Laboratory Findings Patient 1 Patient 2 Patient 3 Fever + + + Splenomegaly + + - Hepatomegaly + + + Lymphadenopathy + - + Rash - - - Neurological signs - - - Anemia + + + Thrombocytopenia + + + Neutropenia + + + Hypertriglyceridemia + + - Hypofibrinogemia + - - Hyperbilirubinemia + - - Hyperferritinemia Not done - + Hemophagocytosis in bone marrow + + + Hemophagocytosis in other parts - + -
Writing about hteir work in the American Academy of Pediatrics, they say that their study is one of six in this issue to explore the topic of bilirubin and hyperbilirubinemia.
In 1994, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) first published a clinical practice guideline to provide a framework for the prevention and management of hyperbilirubinemia (1).
Both boys had many of the problems common to prematurity, including hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure), respiratory distress syndrome, in hemorrhages (bleeding in or around the brain), retinopathy of prematurity (an eye disorder), patent ductus arteriosus (a condition in which oxygenated blood flows back into the lungs rather than circulating to the rest of the body), hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) and anemia.
The most common adverse reactions (incidence 1% or greater) with Erwinaze treatment are systemic hypersensitivity, hyperglycemia, abnormal transaminases, fever, pancreatitis, local reactions, vomiting, nausea, thrombosis, hyperbilirubinemia, abdominal pain/discomfort and diarrhea.
The process of observation, clinical monitoring, and laboratory testing that continues throughout the infant's first week of life has a single objective--to prevent extreme hyperbilirubinemia [a TSB concentration >25-30 mg/dL (>428-513 [micro]mol/L)] and its rare but dreaded consequence, bilirubin encephalopathy.
Other examinations should assess for the clinical risk of hyperbilirubinemia, and for sepsis based on maternal risk factors and in accord with guidelines for preventing perinatal group B streptococcal disease.