hypercalcemia

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hypercalcemia

[‚hī·pər‚kal′sē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Excessive amounts of calcium in the blood. Also known as calcemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
2+] levels slightly lower than in normal mice, despite their hypercalcaemia.
Moreover, patients previously exhibiting high rates of hypercalcaemia with calcium carbonate during randomised treatment showed significantly reduced rates after switching to lanthanum carbonate.
Many of these patients are at risk of developing multiple bone complications including bone pain, pathologic fractures, a need for radiation or surgery to their bones, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcaemia.
Complications resulting from bone metastases include, among others, bone pain, pathologic fractures, a need for radiation or surgery to bone, spinal cord compression, and change of antineoplastic therapy to treat bone pain and hypercalcaemia.
A notable exception to this was hypercalcaemia which was appreciably lower in the FOSRENOL group compared to the calcium carbonate group (6% and 49% respectively).
In addition to chemotherapy, prophylaxis and supportive treatment of bone destruction, pain, anaemia, renal failure, fatigue, infections, hypercalcaemia, and emotional distress are essential parts of the therapeutic management of myeloma patients.
hypothryoidism, vitamin B or folic acid deficiency, niacin deficiency, hypercalcaemia, neurosyphyllis, HIV infection) 3.
Zoledronic Acid Actavis, the generic equivalent of the Zometa brand product from Novartis, is indicated for the prevention of skeletal related events (pathological fractures, spinal compression, radiation or surgery to bone, or tumor-induced hypercalcaemia) in adult patients with advanced malignancies involving bone, and the treatment of adult patients with tumor-induced hypercalcaemia (TIH).
Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with hypercalcaemia.
Milk-alkali syndrome is a major cause of hypercalcaemia among non-end-stage renal disease (non-ESRD) inpatients.
The Food Standards Agency (2003) states that excess vitamin D may result in hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria, resulting in the deposition of calcium in soft tissues, demineralisation of bone and 'irreversible renal and cardiac toxicity'.