hypercholesteremia


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hypercholesteremia

[¦hī·pər·kə‚les·tə′rē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Elevated cholesterol levels in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Japan, patients with dyslipidemia, a lifestyle disease, are on an increasing trend, stimulating demand for hypercholesteremia treatments including Lochol.
These objectives would also have an impact on the incidence of hypercholesteremia.
These included smoking among men, never having had a blood pressure measurement, hypertension, never having had breast and cervical cancer screening tests, and hypercholesteremia.
In the monotherapy setting, Limerick is developing compounds that target the treatment of metabolic diseases such as hypercholesteremia and hyperglycemia via a novel mechanism related to reverse cholesterol transport.
0 y Protection study n = 20500 (2002) MRC/BHF Heart Protection study (2002) ASAP Hypercholesteremia r, p-c, db 6.
Based on these findings, the partners have concluded that the regular intake of natto helps improve hypercholesteremia, hypertriglyceridemia, as well as the quality of life.
NHANES has come a long way since 1960, when researchers at the CDC began periodically conducting interviews and making physical assessments of cohort participants, including collecting blood and urine samples for detecting everything from hypercholesteremia to diabetes.
Patients with a history of smoking, hypertension, diabetes or hypercholesteremia are at an increased risk for developing atherosclerosis.
The Hypercholesteremia Disease and Therapy Review provides an overview of the disease and related conditions, with prevalence numbers and percentages for major countries worldwide, information on diagnosis, and an overview of treatment.
Presently, the induction of hypercholesteremia (model group) resulted in increased LDL-cholesterol levels, reduced SOD activities.
Using the Kurosawa and Kusanagi-Hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits, laboratory rabbits which specifically develop hereditary hypercholesteremia, the company has examined how an intake of Amami-no-Mizu (hardness of 1000), its proprietary high mineral water derived from deep seawater, affects hypertension and arteriosclerosis.
Past medical history revealed a five-year history of stable angina, coronary artery disease, organic heart disease, hypercholesteremia and spinal arthritis.