hypercube


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hypercube

[′hī·pər ‚kyüb]
(computer science)
A configuration of parallel processors in which the locations of the processors correspond to the vertices of a mathematical hypercube and the links between them correspond to its edges.
(mathematics)
The analog of a cube in n dimensions (n = 2, 3, ….), with 2 n vertices, n 2 n-1edges, and 2 n cells; for an object with edges of length 2 a, the coordinates of the vertices are (± a, ± a, …, ± a).

hypercube

A cube of more than three dimensions. A single (2^0 = 1) point (or "node") can be considered as a zero dimensional cube, two (2^1) nodes joined by a line (or "edge") are a one dimensional cube, four (2^2) nodes arranged in a square are a two dimensional cube and eight (2^3) nodes are an ordinary three dimensional cube. Continuing this geometric progression, the first hypercube has 2^4 = 16 nodes and is a four dimensional shape (a "four-cube") and an N dimensional cube has 2^N nodes (an "N-cube"). To make an N+1 dimensional cube, take two N dimensional cubes and join each node on one cube to the corresponding node on the other. A four-cube can be visualised as a three-cube with a smaller three-cube centred inside it with edges radiating diagonally out (in the fourth dimension) from each node on the inner cube to the corresponding node on the outer cube.

Each node in an N dimensional cube is directly connected to N other nodes. We can identify each node by a set of N Cartesian coordinates where each coordinate is either zero or one. Two node will be directly connected if they differ in only one coordinate.

The simple, regular geometrical structure and the close relationship between the coordinate system and binary numbers make the hypercube an appropriate topology for a parallel computer interconnection network. The fact that the number of directly connected, "nearest neighbour", nodes increases with the total size of the network is also highly desirable for a parallel computer.

hypercube

A parallel processing architecture made up of binary multiples of computers (4, 8, 16, etc.). The computers are interconnected so that data travel is kept to a minimum. For example, in two eight-node cubes, each node in one cube would be connected to the counterpart node in the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
n - 1, form a disjoint union of the hypercube [[0, 1].
The new vehicle and route states are then used to select the current hypercube, and consequently to find the new control action that is used for the simulation of the next route step.
More recent, animated works, such as P-1411-e, 2010, use software to picture the eleven-dimensional hypercube and other complex geometric analogues, with elements of the representations randomized.
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The metric space of length-n binary strings with the Hamming distance is known as the Hamming cube; it is equivalent as a metric space to the set of distances between vertices in a hypercube graph.
Security officials at the Los Angeles International Airport have been using game theory (via a computer program) to generate truly random patrols since 2007, according to the November 2007 Hypercube article "Practice Random Acts of Security" by Lauren Cox.
Matching five creates a Hypercube, which eliminates all gems of a certain colour when activated.
As represented in the major classes of Tower of Hanoi and Hamming hypercube graphs; its classic topics: e.
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It might help if I give you a recipe for building what I am trying to describe: instructions for making a (three-dimensional representation of a) tesseract or hypercube, or the four-dimensional equivalent of a cube.