hyperesthesia


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Related to hyperesthesia: allodynia

hyperesthesia

[‚hī·pər·əs′thē·zhə]
(physiology)
Increased sensitivity or sensation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In clinic shortly thereafter, he denied significant radiculopathy including hyperesthesia, despite maintaining an active lifestyle.
Chronic pain states are characterized by hyperalgesia, increased sensitivity to painful stimuli; allodynia, pain associated with a non-noxious stimulus; and hyperesthesia, increased sensitivity to sensory stimuli.
When nerves are involved, the patient might experience pain, anesthesia, paresthesia, hyperesthesia, and weakness.
A 25-year-old man with a 2-month history of weight loss and night sweats complained of recent-onset left thigh pain and hyperesthesia.
He literally copied or incorporated his father's paintings into his works, engaging in a form of Oedipal appropriation, which allowed him to reenter the past in a highly personal manner and cultivate his artistic hyperesthesia.
Treating physicians should monitor patients for symptoms of neuropathy, such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, a burning sensation, neuropathic pain or weakness and institute dose modifications accordingly.
The hyperesthesia of the palm was excessive, so that even to blow on it seemed to give pain.
Patients treated with IXEMPRA should be monitored for symptoms of neuropathy, such as burning sensation, hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, paresthesia, discomfort, or neuropathic pain.
Associated findings also may include hyperesthesia, along with reductions in pinprick sensitivity, light-touch sensation, two-point discrimination, temperature sensitivity, and sweat response.
Hysteria is characteristic for the yells, the hypo, the convulsions, the extensive movements, the cathartic episodes, the sensibility on the hysteric terminals, the hyperesthesia, the headaches and eventually the blindness.
One important caveat to clinicians is the fact that patients with appendicitis may actually have hyperesthesia over McBurney's point, and an excessive pain response to the "pinch" phase should not be dismissed out of hand.
The patient also had headaches and cutaneous hyperesthesia in the lower extremities.