hyperoxemia


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hyperoxemia

[‚hī·pər‚äk′sē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Extreme acidity of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
78) The UH is, therefore, a maternal, hypoxemia-induced, focal-adaptive villous change, whereas PU is associated with intervillous hyperoxemia.
Extreme whole body hyperthermia using the infrared-A technique IRATHERM 2000-selective thermosensitisation by hyperglycemia--circulatory back up by adapted hyperoxemia.
19) In preuterine and uterine placental hypoxia, oxygen is decreased in the intervillous space, whereas in postuterine hypoxia, there is hyperoxemia in the intervillous space, all of which result in hypoxemia in fetal blood (Figure 3).
A PaO2 of greater than 100 mm Hg is often called hyperoxemia.
Finding that "there are significant differences in the response of pulse oximeters during neonatal resuscitation," researchers concluded that "the speed and reliability of the Masimo SET technology can be of help for clinicians to more accurately adjust the fraction of inspired oxygen during newborn resuscitations, thus preventing or minimizing damage secondary to unnecessary exposure of oxygen and hyperoxemia and to wide fluctuations in oxygen levels.
An original manuscript, "Detection of hyperoxemia in neonates: data from three new pulse oximeters," has been published in the November 2002 issue of Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed (2002;87:F217-F219) by B Bohnhorst, MD and CS Peter, MD, Department of Neonatology and Pediatric Pulmonary, Hanover Medical School, Hanover, Germany, and Christian Poets, MD Department of Neonatology, University Hospital, Tubingen, Germany.
In a large group of examined inborn infants <1,250 grams treated by the same neonatologists, MDs and NNPs using the same clinical guideline to decrease hyperoxemia and wide changes in oxygenation, the relative risk rate of severe ROP and laser therapy are associated with the SpO2 technology utilized," the researchers concluded.
In the study entitled Avoiding Hyperoxemia during Neonatal Resuscitation: Time to Response of Different SpO2 Monitors a team of neonatologists from hospitals in Columbia and New Jersey headed by Herando Baquero, Ramiro Alviz, and Augusto Sola performed a prospective observational analysis of 24 newborns who received resuscitation in unstable conditions in the delivery room and NICU to determine whether if SpO2 can be measured reliably and if the time to stable readings is different between different monitors.