hypervelocity


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hypervelocity

[‚hī·pər·və′läs·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
Muzzle velocity of an artillery projectile of 3500 feet per second (1067 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a small-arms projectile of 5000 feet per second (1524 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a tank-cannon projectile in excess of 3350 feet per second (1021 meters per second).
References in periodicals archive ?
When it comes to bending the cost curve, the Navy also has high hopes for hypervelocity projectiles (HVPs), which could use the kinetic energy generated by their high speed to quickly destroy or disable enemy targets such as incoming missiles or forces ashore.
Despite being the closest hypervelocity star, it nonetheless is 249 quadrillion miles from Earth.
When he found the first hypervelocity star, Brown had a hard time believing his own results.
One of the successes I can point to, one of our most prized test assets in the Air Force, is the Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9.
Sullivan added that the album's "success with the inner-city hipster cognoscenti must surely have been connected with the unabashed romanticism inherent in the songs, the way they acted as a canorous (that is, richly melodious, pleasant-sounding) balm for the bruising hypervelocity of modern living and fin-de-siecle stresses.
At these distances, fragment type warheads exploiting hypervelocity impact for kill appeared reasonable against tankage, motors, and other parts of the ICBM in boost.
On 6 August 2002, a ballistic test firing of Raytheon's Hypervelocity Anti-Tank Missile (Hatm) took place in Norway.
Based on laboratory experiments, a Japanese team now reports that these hypervelocity impacts emit microwaves.
The huge force may help to: create ultrahard matter (in the same way that extreme pressures in Earth's interior make diamonds from coal); form better computer models to predict the effects of the impacts of hypervelocity micrometeorites on space stations; and answer basic physics questions such as whether a liquid, rapidly compressed, will become a solid.
He used a hypervelocity gas gun, which fires projectiles (such as quarter-inch metallic spheres) at 4 miles per second at low angles toward ``targets resembling the Yucatan surface - literally dirt or carbonates.
The bullets of hypervelocity guns, which aremeant to be fired at 10 or more kilometers a second--36,000 kilometers an hour--would encouter enormous air resistance down here and would probably burn up.