hypochondriac

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Related to hypochondriacal: hypochondriacal neurosis

hypochondriac

[¦hī·pə¦kän·drē‚ak]
(psychology)
A person affected with hypochondriasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 18th century had been the age of the spa towns, the supposedly curative powers of their mineral springs attracting the wealthy and hypochondriacal alike.
She found herself "worrying in that hypochondriacal and paranoid way that maybe the actual lab got lost, and they were just telling me that I was normal because that is what I would want to hear.
Although Ingmar Bergman's death had long been anticipated, no more so than by the hypochondriacal director himself, it struck me in a surprisingly personal way when I learned of it yesterday, just days before this issue went to press.
It transpired that the 'near-death' thing was a fleeting figment of my hypochondriacal imagination; rather than anything sinister in the coronary department, the seizure was a particularly painful stitch or an extreme bout of acid indigestion.
Robert Hooke, elsewhere viewed as a serious thinker and designer, is here 'a creepy hypochondriacal nerd'.
In some cases male sexual assault victims have also been identified as hypochondriacal (Anderson, 1982).
A male case of monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis responding to olanzapine: A case report.
5) As Dinab acts as "Servant, and nurse, and comforter, and friend" to her hypochondriacal aunt, so does Anne attend the hypochondriacal Mary Musgrove, for Anne is "glad to have any thing marked out as a duty," much as Dinah finds always "some duty to attend" (T 42, P 33, T 43).
Her parents' idea of self-improvement after the birth of their first child is to stop shooting drugs (absent Dad) and sign up for Weight Watchers (omnipresent, hypochondriacal Mom).
Reluctant Genius is, instead, a love story, a tale of the all-encompassing--and critically important--relationship between Bell, a brilliant, obsessive, compulsive, insecure, mercurial, magpie-minded and often hypochondriacal "reluctant genius," and Mabel, his practical, protective, devoted, deaf wife and steel-willed life's partner.
In a later study, Sabo (1990) found that anxiety reactions, depression, and hypochondriacal preoccupations were common among husbands of breast cancer patients.