Hypocrisy

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Hypocrisy

See also Pretension.
Alceste
judged most social behavior as hypocritical. [Fr. Lit.: Le Misanthrope]
Ambrosio
self-righteous abbot of the Capuchins at Madrid. [Br. Lit.: Ambrosio, or The Monk]
Angelo
externally austere but inwardly violent. [Br. Lit.: Measure for Measure]
Archimago
enchanter, disguised as hermit, wins confidence of Knight. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Arsinoé
false prude. [Fr. Lit.: The Misanthrope]
Atar Gul
trusted domestic; betrays those he serves. [Fr. Lit.: Atar Gul, Walsh Modern, 32]
Bigotes
12th-century French order regarded as hypocritical. [Fr. Hist.: Espy, 99]
Blifil
Allworthy’s nephew; talebearer and consummate pietist. [Br. Lit.: Tom Jones]
Blood, Col. Thomas
(1628–1680) false in honor and religion. [Br. Lit.: Peveril of the Peak, Walsh Modern, 61]
Boulanger, Ralph
Emma’s lover pretends repentance to avoid commitment. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary]
Boynton, Egeria
religious charlatan. [Am. Lit.: Undiscovered Country]
Buncombe County
insincere speeches made solely to please this constituency by its representative, 1819–1821. [Am. Usage: Misc.]
Célimène
ridicules people when absent; flatters them when present. [Fr. Lit.: Le Misanthrope]
Cantwell, Dr.
lives luxuriously by religious cant. [Br. Lit.: The Hypocrite, Brewer Handbook, 175]
Chadband, Rev.
pharisaic preacher; thinks he’s edifying his hearers. [Br. Lit.: Bleak House]
Christian, Edward
conspirator; false to everyone. [Br. Lit.: Peveril of the Peak, Walsh Modern, 96]
crocodile tears
crocodile said to weep after devouring prey. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 383; Mercatante, 9–10]
Dimmesdale, Arthur
acted the humble minister for seven years while former amour suffered. [Am. Lit.: The Scarlet Letter]
Gallanbiles, the
pretend piety on Sabbath but demand dinner. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
Gantry, Elmer
ranting preacher succumbs to alcohol, fornication, theft, and cowardice. [Am. Lit.: Elmer Gantry]
Gashford
humble manner masks sly, shirking character. [Br. Lit.: Barnaby Rudge]
Goneril and Regan
to inherit their father’s possessions they falsely profess great love for him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare King Lear]
Haskell, Eddie
gentleman with adults, troublemaker behind their backs. [TV: “Leave it to Beaver” in Terrace, II, 18–19]
Heep, Uriah
the essence of insincerity. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
Honeythunder, Luke
his philanthropy hid animosity. [Br. Lit.: Edwin Drood]
Manders
self-righteous pastor agrees to blackmail. [Nor. Lit.: Ghosts]
Martext, Sir Oliver
a “most vile” hedge-priest. [Br. Lit.: As You Like It]
Mawworm
sanctimonious preacher. [Br. Lit.: The Hypocrite, Brewer Handbook, 687]
Mr. By-ends
embraces religion when it is easy to practice and to his advantage. [Br. Lit.: Bunyan Pilgrim’s Progress]
newspeak
official speech of Oceania; language of contradictions. [Br. Lit.: 1984]
Pecksniff
pretentious, unforgiving architect of double standards. [Br. Lit.: Martin Chuzzlewit]
Pharisees
sanctimonious lawgivers do not practise what they preach. [N.T.: Matthew 3:7; 23:1–15; Luke 18:9–14]
Potemkin village
false fronts constructed to deceive. [Russ. Hist.: Espy, 339]
Sainte Nitouche
sanctimonious and pretentious person (Fr. n’y touche). [Fr. Usage: Brewer Dictionary, 760]
Snawley
sanctimonious hypocrite; placed stepsons in Dotheboys Hall. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
Square, Mr.
Tom’s tutor; spouts hypocritically about the beauty of virtue. [Br. Lit.: Tom Jones]
Surface, Joseph
pays lip service to high principles while engaging in treacherous intrigues. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
Tartuffe
swindles benefactor by pretending religious piety. [Fr. Lit.: Tartuffe]
Vicar of Bray
changes religious affiliation to suit reigning monarch. [Br. Folklore: Walsh Classical, 61]
Walrus
wept in sympathy for the oysters he and the Carpenter devoured. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
Whelp, the
nickname for hypocritical Tom Gradgrind. [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
whited sepulchres
analogy in Jesus’s denunciation of Pharisees’ sanctimony. [N.T.: Matthew 23:27]
References in classic literature ?
He is a hypocrite, a rascal who has himself roused the people to riot.
If I had been the vilest hypocrite living, I doubt even then if my face could have kept my secret while my mind was full of Benjamin's letter.
Yet I could not but perceive that she was at times unhappy and dissatisfied with herself or her position, and truly I myself was not quite contented with the latter: this assumption of brotherly nonchalance was very hard to sustain, and I often felt myself a most confounded hypocrite with it all; I saw too, or rather I felt, that, in spite of herself, 'I was not indifferent to her,' as the novel heroes modestly express it, and while I thankfully enjoyed my present good fortune, I could not fail to wish and hope for something better in future; but, of course, I kept such dreams entirely to myself.
But Oedipus spurns the hypocrite, and invokes a dire curse on both his unnatural sons.
He will sow his wild oats," she would say, "and is worth far more than that puling hypocrite of a brother of his.
No, no,' says her friend, 'I can assure you Sir is no hypocrite, he is really an honest, sober gentleman, and he has certainly been robbed.
Well, well,' says my governess, 'that's none of my business; if it was, I warrant I should find there was something of that kind in it; your modest men in common opinion are sometimes no better than other people, only they keep a better character, or, if you please, are the better hypocrites.
It is clear to you, I hope, that Stephen was not a hypocrite,--capable of deliberate doubleness for a selfish end; and yet his fluctuations between the indulgence of a feeling and the systematic concealment of it might have made a good case in support of Philip's accusation.
Unless the dear brown eyes were the falsest hypocrites in the world, it was impossible that she should have forgotten me.
the Hypocrites, whose principal industries are murder and cheating,
There are so many hypocrites in this church that it isn't fit for decent people to come to," she said.
A treacherous friend is the most dangerous enemy; and I will say boldly, that both religion and virtue have received more real discredit from hypocrites than the wittiest profligates or infidels could ever cast upon them: nay, farther, as these two, in their purity, are rightly called the bands of civil society, and are indeed the greatest of blessings; so when poisoned and corrupted with fraud, pretence, and affectation, they have become the worst of civil curses, and have enabled men to perpetrate the most cruel mischiefs to their own species.