hypodontia


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Related to hypodontia: oligodontia, anodontia, ectodermal dysplasia

hypodontia

[‚hī·pə′dän·chə]
(medicine)
The congenital absence of teeth. Also known as anodontia; oligodontia.
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The majority of MSX1 mutations are autosomal dominant and result in hypodontia and oligodontia, however an autosomal recessive mutation has been identified [Chishti et al.
Phenotypic and Genotypic Features of Familial Hypodontia [PhD Thesis].
org 1,3,6 HYPERLIPODEMA See: Autoimmune Disorders HYPEROXALURIA See: Oxalosis & Hyperoxaluria HYPERTELORISM/ HYPOSPADIUS SYNDROMES See: Opitz Syndrome HYPERTHERMIA OF ANESTHESIA See: Malignant Hyperthermia HYPERTHYROID MYOPATHY See: Muscular Dystrophy; Thyroid Disorder HYPERURICEMIA-CHOREOATH ETOSIS-SELF-MUTILATION SYNDROME See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPERURICEMIA, HEREDITARY See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPODONTIA AND NAIL DYSGENESIS See: Ectodermal Dysplasias HYPOERYTHEMIA, PROGRESSIVE See: Anemia, Aplastic HYPOGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA See: Immune Disorders HYPOMELANOSIS OF ITO See: Ectodermal Dysplasias; Epilepsy; Incontinentia Pigmenti; Vitiligo HYPOMYELINATION See: Myelin Disorders HYPOPARATHYROIDISM Hypoparathyroidism Association, Inc.
Through childhood, the focus of medical care for XLHED patients may shift to the chronic skin issues and severe hypodontia with its associated medical and self-esteem issues.
Furthermore, it is thought that this kind of resorptive process does not apply to the type of resorption found in permanent molars, because they do not have a primary predecessor similarly it does not apply to any permanent tooth in patients who have hypodontia where the primary predecessor is congenitally missing.
Missing Teeth This trait is known as hypodontia, the congenital absence of one or more teeth.
The literature contains numerous reports of exclusive occurrence of these anomalies; however coexistent oligodontia, hypodontia and supernumerary teeth or hyperdontia is a rare mixed anomalous condition of the human dentition [Das et al.
Although progress has been made toward understanding the developmental basis of tooth formation, there is still a need to fully understand the aetiology of inherited hypodontia, which is multifactorial [Polder et al.
net 1,2,3,5,6,9 HYPERLIPODEMA See: Autoimmune Disorders HYPEROXALURIA See: Oxalosis & Hyperoxaluria HYPERTELORISM/ HYPOSPADIUS SYNDROMES See: Opitz Syndrome HYPERTHERMIA OF ANESTHESIA See: Malignant Hyperthermia HYPERTHYROID MYOPATHY See: Muscular Dystrophy; Thyroid Disorder HYPERURICEMIA-CHOREOATH ETOSIS-SELF-MUTILATION SYNDROME See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPERURICEMIA, HEREDITARY See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPODONTIA AND NAIL DYSGENESIS See: Ectodermal Dysplasias HYPOERYTHEMIA, PROGRESSIVE See: Anemia, Aplastic HYPOGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA See: Immune Disorders HYPOMELANOSIS OF ITO See: Ectodermal Dysplasias; Epilepsy; Incontinentia Pigmenti; Vitiligo HYPOMYELINATION See: Myelin Disorders HYPOPARATHYROIDISM See also: Thyroid Disorders Hypoparathyroidism Newsletter 2835 Salmon St.
This case reports only the second case of Fraser Syndrome (FS) in the dental literature, and the first with hypodontia and shortened roots.
Dental history As her primary dentition erupted it became apparent that she had hypodontia and anomalies of dental morphology, and her mother was concerned that her pointed incisors might cause trauma to the soft tissues.