hypogene


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to hypogene: supergene

hypogene

[′hī·pə‚jēn]
(geology)
Of minerals or ores, formed by ascending waters.
Of geologic processes, originating within or below the crust of the earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speleogenesis in continental settings occurs in two diagenetic settings, which is based on the characteristics of the soluble fluids: 1) epigene and 2) hypogene (e.
Drill Results have indicated an approximate 400 meter by 200 meter root zone of copper-dominant hypogene mineralization at depth beneath the prior drill floor.
The hypogene zone is at least 250 metres wide on this section.
In the Cananea district in general, hypogene copper mineralization is present as sulfides disseminated in breccias and stockworks.
L'intrusion porphyrique et la mineralisation hypogene sont tributaires de failles, auxquelles s'est ensuite ajoute un enrichissement supergene sous climat semi-aride.
Hypogene ore minerals are chalcopyrite, bornite, and chalcocite.
Other organic acids, such as humic acids, or those derived from the oxidation of substances of hypogene origin, such as hydrogen sulphide, may also dissolve the calcite (and thus limestone) and cause karstic erosion.
The hypogene mineralisation is characterised by a mineral assemblage of pyrite, chalcopyrite, minor molybdenite and traces of bornite and other minor copper sulphide species.
These chalcopyrite, hypogene chalcocite and lead bearing veins type deposits, even if of small size, will be valuable addition to porphyry ores which are usually of lower grade.
Hypogene alunite alteration is typically observed throughout the whole of the Maricunga belt, associated with advanced argillic alteration caps that overlay gold bearing porphyry-type stockwork systems.
He also supported other BHP operations through research and development of hypogene ore processing.
Malachite and azurite, along with primary hypogene chalcocite and the presence of bornite and chalcopyrite, have been identified at depths of at least 100 m.