hypostatic


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hypostatic

[¦hī·pō′stad·ik]
(genetics)
Subject to being suppressed, as a gene that can be suppressed by a nonallelic gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
49) Christians, he argues, accept too many doctrines that are contrary to nature and reason, such as the Trinity, Christ's hypostatic union, the Eucharist, and the Resurrection.
E HUNDT, Contemplation and Hypostatic Procession in Plotinus, "Apeiron" 15 (1981) 71-79.
I think all my characters are hypostatic, to use a pedantic word.
The Unity of Christ is a historical-theological study of Patristic Christology, which focuses on how the early church Fathers established an authoritative theological tradition, particularly in light of the difficulties and controversies around the hypostatic union of humanity and divinity in Jesus Christ.
Leftow, in his attempt to move beyond 'traditional christology,' which he claims, "is often content to leave these relations--those of hypostatic union--a mystery," suggests eight options and argues in defense of one of them in particular: that God the Son, a human body, and a human soul came to compose one thing, but that the human body and soul did not become part of God the Son.
It expects to see a male initiate not just because "everyone knows" Christ is a man--the hypostatic logic and artistic tradition is anything but clear on this unless we insist on gendering god--but because the post-9/11 audience would be unable to read a woman as other than a victim, and worse a victim whose heroic body might be construed as a pornographic object disqualified from heroic transcendence.
Respiratory depression and hypostatic pneumonia may occur in gamma GHB intoxication, for which there is no effective antidote, so these patients may require intubation and mechanical ventilation.
Other themes follow the traditional Orthodox theological perspective, as, for example, trinitarian theology, human beings created in God's image and likeness or the Chalcedonian dogma about hypostatic union.
He authored Hypostatic Personality: Psychopathology of Doing and Being Made (Premier, 2001).
The topics include the Dutch origins of Van Til's appraisal, Barth on the hypostatic union, the problems of universalism, and an engagement between Bath and radical orthodoxy.
Christ is to be adored by angels and men, but that to him as man angels and men are subject, and must recognize his empire; by reason of the hypostatic union Christ has power over all creatures.
Common elements included: "a decisive turn back to patristic sources, an emphasis on the inherently social character of the Church, as opposed to the modern conception which sees it as a mere collection of individuals, a call to hold visible and invisible together as two aspects of a single church, with an appeal to the hypostatic union as the foundation of this unity, a focus on the Eucharist as that which constitutes the Church, and an attempt to describe the Church as a supernatural body that fulfills nature, rather than a supernature alongside or against nature" (148-49).