hypovolemia


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hypovolemia

[‚hī·pō‚vä′lē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Low blood volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ventilated patients with presumed hypovolemia who received fluid expansion at the discretion of the attending physician were consecutively included.
Risk stratification prior to delivery, recognition and identification of the source of bleeding, and aggressive early resuscitation to prevent hypovolemia are paramount.
Determinants of the hyperdynamic circulation and central hypovolemia in cirrhosis.
It may be precipitated hypercalcemia, hypovolemia, intravenous contrast, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
All patients were given intravenous albumin 1g/kg up to maximum of 100 gm to exclude hypovolemia before confirmation of HRS.
2002; 2003; 2007) reported that a suppression of dry forage intake during the early stages of feeding was partly caused by feeding-induced hypovolemia, which was produced by the accelerated secretion of parotid saliva.
The relationship of hyponatremia and higher pneumonia severity probably reflects the presence of hypovolemia, severe sepsis, and subsequent activation of vasopressin and natriuretic peptides secretion [6].
Persistent hypoxia as a result of the embolization plus prolonged hypotension, inadequate collateral vascularization, and hypovolemia from the initial injuries may have led to compromised tissue viability.
Goal directed therapy (GDT) was implemented during the intraoperative period based on cardiac output values obtained after the initial administration of 1000 mL, increased to 4000 mL in response to signs of hypovolemia.
On the basis of findings of this study, it was concluded that HSS offsets deleterious hemodynamic effects of hypovolemia, improves oxygenation, corrects metabolic acidosis and increases survival in E.
Patients who are kept NPO for an extended period of time are at a higher risk of irritability, headache, dehydration, hypovolemia, and hypoglycemia (Crenshaw & Winslow, 2002).
Isosmotic hypovolemia (volume depletion without alterations in osmolality) has been demonstrated to reduce sweat rates, which is an effect thought to be important for preserving blood volume during exercise (Fortney et al.