ice crystal


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ice crystal

[′īs ‚krist·əl]
(physical chemistry)
Any one of a number of macroscopic crystalline forms in which ice appears, including hexagonal columns, hexagonal platelets, dendritic crystals, ice needles, and combinations of these forms; although the crystal lattice of ice is hexagonal in its symmetry, varying conditions of temperature and vapor pressure can lead to growth of crystalline forms in which the simple hexagonal pattern is almost undiscernible.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, how well gelatin hydrolysate can inhibit the growth of ice crystals in ice cream has not been extensively examined.
In particular, we recommend new measurements of ice crystal shapes in the very cold tropical tropopause layer-a region of the atmosphere important for both climate and transport into the stratosphere and where we expect stacking disorder to persist and crystals to be trigonal.
The distance between the ice crystal generator and the test section has been maximized to increase as far as possible the residence time for a complete freezing of the droplets (Figure 3).
Their model hinges on the idea that ice crystals are forming on atmospheric particles that were previously thought to be useless for making ice crystals.
US plane maker Boeing told airlines last month to avoid flying the 787s within 50 nautical miles of thunderstorms to avoid formation of ice crystals.
Sorbetto contains less water and thus has fewer ice crystals, so it is somewhat softer and more intensely flavored.
In the first category, the touch of the growing ice crystal caused the test specimen to act as a secondary nucleation site from which multiple new crystals grew rapidly.
Interestingly, a mutant AFP in which one alanine is replaced with a leucine, is also able to inhibit crystallization, even though this mutant is ineffective at inhibiting the growth of pure ice crystals.
CAS freezing works on the simple principle that water molecules cannot cluster and form cell-wall-damaging ice crystals if they are in motion during the freezing process.
The process of freezing can markedly affect texture, as the formation of ice crystals disrupts cells' structures, for example.
In order to a grow, an ice crystal must stay cold, but water gives off heat as it freezes.
Sharp ice crystals in the seed embryo mean instant death for most seeds--but not for those of winterfat, a low-growing shrub that thrives from the Yukon to Mexico.