Idiolect

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Idiolect

 

(also called individual language), the linguistic habits of a given individual in a particular time period. Such linguistic phenomena as the various speech communities— professional, social, and territorial dialects and jargons—are formed on the basis of the aggregate of idiolects unified by a relationship of mutual comprehension. The idiolect is a conventional concept, since the same person, as a rule, uses different linguistic means in different situations of communication. Researchers in logopedics are investigating the individual idiolects of aphasiacs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since what counts as a public language depends on how individuals mentally represent the characteristics of sets of idiolects, those sets of idiolects mentally represented in relation to cultural identity can be individuated in ways culturally arbitrary sets of idiolects cannot.
These complexes of instructions for articulation, perception and thought are linguistic expressions of a given person's psychological idiolect.
Thus, the idiolect can be defined as the selection of linguistic elements that a speaker makes among a set of linguistic elements available in his/her language.
In the second stage of the SNA, the qualitative method has been applied for explaining possible differences and similarities in idiolects and micro-networks formed by the four most important ties that bind the villagers as a social unit, namely kinship, friendship, neighbourhood and the workplace.
Holm-Hudson's analyses succeed in demonstrating Tony Banks's keyboard idiolect as a defining feature of Genesis's progressive epoch, but readers unversed in parsimonious voice-leading may question the connection between his analytical method and this conclusion, while readers versed in parsimonious voice-leading may find the conclusion somewhat superfluous.
The reader's assessment of the narrator's (un-)reliability is not based on ontological privileges, but rather on the stylistic profile and rhetorical performance of the particular dictions and idiolects involved: because "the greatest sinologist in the world" uses a more elaborated code than the other characters (especially the female ones) and because the narrator follows suit, the reader tends to get oblivious to the subsequent infiltration of Kien's worldview into the narratorial discourse, despite blatant exaggerations and inconsistencies.
The mean position of a term corresponds to its tendency to occur at the beginning of elicited lists of terms, while the frequency of that term corresponds to the occurrence of the term in the idiolects of all subjects.
The most frequently used verb for 'to wish, want' is rad, yrid, but in the idiolects of some speakers the pseudoverb bidd + pron.
In this sense, there is no language, only idiolects.
Our 'cultural identities' are like dialects and idiolects.
Underlying this variety of forms, as well as the delight, apparent in the poetry, in things, places, people (particularly children and eccentrics), animals, sounds and idiolects, is a sense of the universe that is mercifully un-Christian and more Heraclitean or Taoist; in the wonderful poem "Holy Cow," the universe is characterised as 'radiant / free / ongoing creation', and as wholly unhuman, indifferent to us.
On the other hand, it is just as significant that the protagonist in first-person narrative is often recognizable by his idiolects, idiosyncrasies, prejudices, etc.