idyl


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idyl

(ī`dəl), short poem. The ancient idyls, especially those of Bion and Moschus, were intended as little selections in the style of such longer poems as elegies or epics. There are 10 famous idyls by the Greek TheocritusTheocritus
, fl. c.270 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet, b. Syracuse. The history of the pastoral begins with him, and in him the form seems to have reached its height. His poetic style is finished and at times artificial, but the bucolic characters in his idyls seem alive.
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, and, since some of them dealt with pastoral or rural scenes, the term idyl came to be restricted to gently flowing, artistic pieces on rural subjects. In the 19th cent., Alfred Tennyson in his Idylls of the King used the term rather in its looser original sense than in the later restricted pastoral meaning. For idyls in their bucolic sense, see pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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idyll

(sometimes US), idyl
1. a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc.
2. any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
3. a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character
References in periodicals archive ?
The ultimate weaver, as Larcom suggests at the conclusion of An Idyl of Work (182-83), is the divine force that creates love in the world
A Strange Medley-Book': Lucy Larcom's An Idyl of Work" New England Quarterly 80 (March 2007), 1:5-34.
8) Slotkin challenges the nature of Larcom's politics in An Idyl of Work.
IMAN Cosmetics is about providing options for all different shades of skin and acknowledging and addressing variety in beauty and cosmetics," states Idyl Mohallim.
7 It would be another year before Whitman would hear from Stoddard again, but in the meantime the scene Stoddard described to Whitman in his letter--of meeting the eighteen-year-old boy in Hawaii--had flourished into Stoddard's "A South Sea Idyl," first published in the Overland Monthly, September 1869 (and later, again, in the South-Sea Idyls collection).
Upon his return to San Francisco from his South Seas excursion early in 1870, he could not resist sending Whitman the Overland Monthly version of the "South Sea Idyl.
May I not send you a proze idyl wherein I confess how dear it is to me?
Even if the tension Whitman identifies between Stoddard's sentimentalism and his own gritty practicality is somewhat lost on Stoddard, that tension no doubt fertilizes the growth of Stoddard's hybrid "proze idyl.
The Miller's Daughter," the first of Tennyson's English idyls (or a progenitor of the type), offers an alternative to the southern passion of the Greek and Spanish women who precede her and to the violence of the northern ballad sisters who follow.
41) That Irving's mariner adumbrates Tennyson's is complicated by a brilliant ditty the poet wrote shortly before "Ulysses," namely "Anacaona," an Irving-inspired idyl about a happy tropical isle, Haiti, whose delightful and accomplished princess the Spanish invaders ultimately enchained and hung, on patently false charges.
20) Donald Hair, "Browning's 'Pan and Luna': An Experiment in Idyl," BSN 4, no.
United in "Panama," the discourse of the married couple divides in the following poem, "Martinique Idyl," a dramatic dialogue that resolves the wedding thread of "The Carib Sea" by realigning the husband's discourse with Tennyson's Ulysses and the wife's reply with the choral song of his Lotos-Eaters.