idyl


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idyl

(ī`dəl), short poem. The ancient idyls, especially those of Bion and Moschus, were intended as little selections in the style of such longer poems as elegies or epics. There are 10 famous idyls by the Greek TheocritusTheocritus
, fl. c.270 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet, b. Syracuse. The history of the pastoral begins with him, and in him the form seems to have reached its height. His poetic style is finished and at times artificial, but the bucolic characters in his idyls seem alive.
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, and, since some of them dealt with pastoral or rural scenes, the term idyl came to be restricted to gently flowing, artistic pieces on rural subjects. In the 19th cent., Alfred Tennyson in his Idylls of the King used the term rather in its looser original sense than in the later restricted pastoral meaning. For idyls in their bucolic sense, see pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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idyll

(sometimes US), idyl
1. a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc.
2. any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
3. a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, much like her heroine Mary Idyl, she "early evinced an uncontrollable desire for an education" (Centennial and Illustrated Wayne County 92).
This entirely fits with Larcom's dedication of Idyl of Work:
Six months of preparation and experiment were required for An Idyl to come to performance.
Part 2, |The Mythopoeic Period 1833-89', offers its share of |high' literary samples, notably Helen Hunt Jackson's angry A Century of Dishonor: A Sketch of the United States Government's Dealings with Some of the Indian Tribes (1881), Mark Twain's wonderfully vernacular Roughing It (1899), and a run of pieces complete in themselves like Bret Harte's wry, anti-heroic |The Idyl of Red Gulch' (1870), Stephen Crane's mini-western |The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky' (1898) and Willa Cather's Kansas Civil War story |The Sculptor's Funeral' (from her Collected Stories, 1905).
And in the midst of this idyl Ottawa's interest payments on its growing debt started to rise.
Six to One: A Nantucket Idyl (1878) reflects his voyage to Hawaii in the previous year.
American Idyl - Despite saying they'd choose to spend their weekend in an exciting city, when faced with a specific locale, 54% of Americans said they'd rather spend the weekend in Hawaii, compared to Paris (26%), London (14%), or their hometown (5%).
In chapter six, Cook draws an intriguing comparison between two late nineteenth-century memoirs about Lowell before moving on to an insightful discussion of Larcom's epic poem An Idyl of Work (1875).
With what eventually became "The Brook: An Idyl," Tennyson in Maud, and Other Poems offered a new comment on the subdued argument with himself that was worked out in the inhospitable textures of his little Hamlet.
As Stoddard develops what he would come to call his "proze idyl," collecting them as a series of linked stories (and later writing a novel that loosely follows the same formal principle), the books he produces come to resemble more the anthologies of Carpenter and Prime-Stevenson than the poetry of Whitman.
As early as Theocritus's "First Idyl," the griever is addressed by voices urging him to temper his sorrow and to rejoin the community of the living, and the tradition is continued with variations through almost all the major elegies.
The griefing sounded Anglo-Saxon, like something from an idyl.