ignoble

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ignoble

Falconry
a. designating short-winged hawks that capture their quarry by swiftness and adroitness of flight
b. designating quarry which is inferior or unworthy of pursuit by a particular species of hawk or falcon
References in periodicals archive ?
Instructing his army of Myrmidons to surround and murder unarmed Hector, he ignobly drags his body across the windy plains of Troy.
At this we have thus far failed ignobly because we have neither the clarity of vision nor the courage to use force where it is obviously and responsibly required for the defense of this country and the world.
Ignobly, I felt a bit of schadenfreude when I began Passages in Caregiving.
The self-congratulatory duo of the dour Puritan work ethic unite proudly against the scandal of the lower classes: vice-ridden ("unbashful forehead[s]"), ignobly concerned about their wages ("sweat .
Watt [sic] Whitman, who scorns the vulgar trammels of rhyme and rhythm to which his predecessor is a slave, and also those of decency, which ignobly bind the majority of mankind" (86).
who] once violently talked of whipping the reluctant youths of the land off to the War, and who themselves have ignobly speculated upon the necessities of the soldier and his family, accumulated fortunes out of the sacrifice of those that have bared their bosoms to the bayonet, and yet skulk away from danger themselves.
Bailey, Grocer is "an absolute realism in the sphere of the ignobly decent"), accommodates both large ideas and small events.
Moreover, he echoes the European-wide sense that to show too great an interest in money was to act ignobly.
The Muslim conspirator feigning adoption of Christianity acted ignobly, while the same strategy of the King of Tars' daughter merely displays her intelligence in implementing gradual Christianization of the Orient.
The family had begun ignobly with the birth in 1672 of an illegitimate son of King Charles II of England and his French mistress.
Behind both stories lies a violence hidden by ideas of sacrifice that ennoble the Indians but show Hester to be ignobly selfish.