illuminating

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illuminating

[ə′lü·mə‚nād·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
The hand decoration of books, as done in medieval times, with drawings and miniature paintings, or with embellishments, usually in red, blue, and gold, added to initial letters and borders.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rise of the 'Kingdom of Appolonia' represents an instance (albeit on a small scale) of a process of political consolidation that was evident elsewhere in the wider Akan world in this period, notably in the interior, with the rise of the large expansionist 'empires' of Denkyira, Akwamu and Asante, as studied illuminatingly by Ray Kea (1982).
This is, illuminatingly, to make a start on incorporating an inevitable undertow of natural presences into criticism of even 'high' modernist poets.
What You Will is an unabashedly and illuminatingly theoretical book.
Another point made illuminatingly in the story is the power of manipulation offered by language, which is represented both by Hermann and Falk.
It would be hard, I believe, for him to explain illuminatingly pictorial composition and the role of color in painting (except, of course, insofar as he could cite and critique the commentaries of his sighted colleagues).
They need to be preserved and cherished in all their richness profound or punning or philosophical, obvious occasionally and more often than not, illuminatingly obscure.
May and other philosophers have written illuminatingly about global justice, but their proposals for institutional reform frequently come across as naive.
But it was so good last Sunday to hear a tiny BCMG (just two duos) perform music by two of the greats of the recent past, Stockhausen and Berio, and so charmingly and illuminatingly introduced by artist-in-association John Woolrich.
You need a technical grasp of the subject to write illuminatingly about it even without the aid of technical jargon, and most comparatists lack, or feel they lack, that competence.
Illuminatingly, US magazine Entertainment Weekly, on first sight of this show, commented: "The unintended message he delivered was one from West Coast America: 'Don't take our cheeseburgers away from us, you pushy Brit'.
Barnard blends these disparate elements flawlessly, and each converses illuminatingly with the others.
In his 1982 interview with John Haffenden, Geoffrey Hill illuminatingly declared: