imagery


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imagery

1. figurative or descriptive language in a literary work
2. Psychol
a. the materials or general processes of the imagination
b. the characteristic kind of mental images formed by a particular individual

imagery

[′im·ij·rē]
(psychology)
Mental images that are collectively recalled.

imagery

The representation of objects reproduced by optical, IR (infrared), or electronic means on film, electronic display devices, or other media.
References in classic literature ?
He ground his great teeth together, raved, stamped, and swore in barbarous tongues and with barbarous imagery.
It was well said by Themistocles, to the king of Persia, That speech was like cloth of Arras, opened and put abroad; whereby the imagery doth appear in figure; whereas in thoughts they lie but as in packs.
The genial disdain of Michel Rollin, who called them impostors, was answered by him with vituperation, of which crapule and canaille were the least violent items; he amused himself with abuse of their private lives, and with sardonic humour, with blasphemous and obscene detail, attacked the legitimacy of their births and the purity of their conjugal relations: he used an Oriental imagery and an Oriental emphasis to accentuate his ribald scorn.
The poem of [98] "Resolution and Independence" is a storehouse of such records; for its fulness of lovely imagery it may be compared to Keats's "Saint Agnes' Eve.
Clear and delicate at once as he is in the outlining of visible imagery, he is more finely scrupulous still in the noting of sounds; he conceives of noble sound as even moulding the human countenance to nobler types, and as something actually "profaned" by visible form or colour.
My," I thought, "what a wonderful targ--" I stopped even thinking, so surprised and shocked was I by the boldness of my imagery.
His mirror of vision was silver-clear, a flashing, dazzling palimpsest of imagery.
The cows swung placidly down the lane, and Anne followed them dreamily, repeating aloud the battle canto from MARMION--which had also been part of their English course the preceding winter and which Miss Stacy had made them learn off by heart--and exulting in its rushing lines and the clash of spears in its imagery.
Nowhere in Plato is there a deeper irony or a greater wealth of humor or imagery, or more dramatic power.
Professor Watson says: "I should throw out imagery altogether and attempt to show that all natural thought goes on in terms of sensori-motor processes in the larynx.
He had reached the parlour door in time to receive in full the shock of Karl Yundt's eloquent imagery.
His imagery was all drawn from the sea, and from the incidents of a seaman's life; and was often remarkably good.