imbricate

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imbricate

[′im·brə·kət]
(biology)
Having overlapping edges, such as scales, or the petals of a flower.

imbricate

To overlap in regular order, as shingling, tiles, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This can be understood analytically as the outcome of a spatial dialectic: the imbrications of physical or material space, representational space, and spatial representation (or lived space).
Her discussion of the poem as a text that creates and defers desire and that uses stylistic shifts to do so; her sly critique of anti-sex moralists; her appreciation of Venus's anarchic eroticism--all these make for a persuasive and stylish engagement with a poem that has often stymied other critics and show what her book aims to do, namely, to reveal how the imbrication of theory and practical criticism can produce landmark work.
Moyn documents this shift by addressing the career of the well-known champion of human rights, Louis Henkin, and by tracing the initial reluctance of international lawyers to embracing the idea because of its perceived imbrications with anti-colonialism.
These spatial imbrications are multiplied by Thayer's modulated use of flicker effects, vertical roll, and outmoded color processing to recalibrate the image of the original painting into ever new technical arrangements.
Opening chapters review theoretical concerns of understanding globalizing city regions, while the remaining chapters present case studies addressing the role of sub-national formal and informal political actors in global governance, with each focusing on one of three sub-themes: "the diverse ways in which cities and sub-national regions impact nation-state foreign policy; the various dimensions of urban imbrications in global environmental politics; or the multiple methods and standards used to measure the global role of cities.
The resilience and the imbrications of her personality run through the writings and illuminate an intimate picture of a young adolescent, growing up in a bourgeois family and striking out with an intellectual and existential ambition exceedingly rare in a young woman at the time.
Study abroad galvanizes at the forefront of student consciousness what Lionel Trilling once called a "culture's hum and buzz of implication" (206) or the dense imbrications of background cultural assumptions that, literally, go without saying in one's familiar home culture.
A range of work has mapped the imbrications of different affects in power formations that modulate the circulation and distribution of affects by intervening and directing ongoing processes--rather than exclusively through the prescriptive normalizations of forms of disciplinary power .