immune

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immune

Med protected against a specific disease by inoculation or as the result of innate or acquired resistance

immune

[i′myün]
(immunology)
Safe from attack; protected against a disease by an innate or an acquired immunity.
Pertaining to or conferring immunity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inflammation caused by runaway immune reactions is the root cause of auto-immune diseases such as insulin-dependent diabetes and arthritis.
These are the only two agents that are known to not interfere with the desired immune reaction.
This, in turn, is linked to their possession of polymorphisms in immunoregulatory genes that influence the magnitude and pattern of any immune reaction.
In early RNAi experiments, researchers saw some hints that the technique could induce an immune reaction or switch off the wrong gene or genes.
Traditional vaccine adjuvants may help antigens (the small part of a pathogen that is injected during vaccination that the body reacts to) to persist so the body can have an immune reaction and build antibodies so that when a real pathogen, such as the flu virus arrives, it will be conquered.
One reason for the trial's failure was that the immune reaction went too far, producing inflammation in the central nervous system.
47] On the other hand, Hamill et al were not able to detect antibodies against canine distemper virus in a serologic study of patients with Paget's disease, [48] and there are no published serologic studies describing the occurrence of a humoral immune reaction against measles virus in patients with Paget's disease.
And there it has a potentially important effect, for TGFF3 can calm down or stop any immune reaction taking place in brain tissues nearby.
What is proving more difficult is that the H5 molecule is not a powerhouse at stimulating an immune reaction.
Type 1 diabetes, which can strike children at any age, occurs when an aberrant immune reaction kills cells in the pancreas, requiring a person to take insulin shots.
Immunocamouflage" technique hides blood cells from antibodies that could trigger a potentially fatal immune reaction that occurs when blood types do not match.
A FAULTY immune reaction may be responsible for the development of epilepsy, research shows.