implicit memory


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implicit memory

[im‚plis·ət ′mem·rē]
(psychology)
A type of memory that is expressed through performance, rather than conscious recall, such as information acquired during skill learning, habit formation, classical conditioning, emotional learning, and priming. Also known as nondeclarative memory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus there is no evidence to suggest the performance of the test for implicit memory was inferior in the younger child.
Vicary (2004) compared individuals with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome regarding explicit and implicit memory function.
In the younger participants the pattern was reversed: better explicit than implicit memory and better explicit memory than their elders.
Attention suppression is a plausible explanation for directed forgetting in implicit memory as well, if participants do, in fact, adopt ex plicit retrieval strategies on implicit tests.
He sees this line of research as a natural extension of experimental psychologists' explorations into the "comfortable unconscious" of implicit memory.
This opens the door for error and distortion of the implicit memory in the explicit memory system.
While there are minor conceptual distinctions between these concepts, they are all representations of relational experiences that are encoded in implicit memory.
As in many studies of implicit memory, participants usually produced an already viewed word when presented with a letter string from that word (SN: 11/17/90, p.
At its core, the Pathways to Memory program is a proactive intervention tool aimed at preserving implicit memory - memory expressed through performance, rather than conscious recall - and improving overall cognition.
Because we are not aware when implicit memory is operating, it functions as an "attachment filter" as discussed in the previous article (Hall, 2007, this issue).
In recent years research and theory in areas such as the neurobiology of emotion and attachment, implicit memory (Schore, 2003a, 2003b; Siegel, 1999), attachment theory (Bowlby, 1969, 1973, 1980; Cassidy & Shaver, 1999), infant-caregiver relationships (Beebe & Lachmann, 2002), relational psychoanalysis (Mitchell, 2000; Stern et al.
Most researchers now agree that implicit memory is more influential than explicit, conscious memory," says psychologist Robert G.