inanition


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inanition

exhaustion resulting from lack of food

inanition

[‚in·ə′nish·ən]
(medicine)
The exhausted, pathologic condition resulting from starvation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Anyhow, I may not be far wrong in assuming that a danger deeper and more dismal is inherent in spiritual inanition and levelling than the boredom and dissatisfaction of a tiny "minority" of refined intellectuals.
One of the main problems related to this issue was inanition, either because the scorpion rejected the prey, or because the use of the wrong size of prey to feed the animals.
Bacteria have a great potential to respond to stressing factors, be it competition between microorganisms or environmental fluctuations, such as sudden changes in temperature, low activity in water, inanition, oxydative stress, etc (Stewart, 2002).
The reasons for mortality in 1-30 day lambs and kids may be due to inability to suckle the milk consequent to inflammation, pain and over growth of periodontal tissue and death due to inanition.
In recent years, ECT has assumed an increasingly important role in the treatment of severe and medication-resistant depression and mania, as well as in the treatment of schizophrenic patients with affective disorders, suicidal drive, delusional symptoms, vegetative dysregulation, inanition, and catatonic symptoms2,3.
Hyperuricemia and gout appear on the ground of multiple risk factors: genetic predisposition, male gender, advanced age, dietary factors, reduced physical activity and also prolonged walking, local trauma, infections, prolonged inanition, parenteral feeding and some medications (aspirin, diuretics).
100) The others are food and drink, inanition and repletion, air, exercise, and the passions or emotions.
Children at present devitalized by malnourishment and illness are severely liable to disease and the menace of unexpected, severe inanition.
9) Though Tennyson does not reproduce exactly this account of Elaine's progressive physical debilitation, he does imply that her confinement has been accompanied by marked somatic changes, suggestive of inanition.
In April 1952, the Soviet Union tabled an amendment explicitly stating that the right to work "should be guaranteed by the State, with the object of creating conditions precluding the threat of death from hunger or inanition.