inbreeding depression


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Related to inbreeding depression: heterosis

inbreeding depression

[′in‚brēd·iŋ di‚presh·ən]
(genetics)
A decrease in fitness and vigor as a result of inbreeding.
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Inbreeding trend and inbreeding depression in the Danish populations of Texel, Shropshire, and Oxford Down.
Inbreeding depression and maternal effects on early performance of Pacific abalone.
Gage said: "It seems that inbreeding depression in sperm competitiveness was caused by a decrease in either sperm quantity or quality that is critical for relative competitiveness, but still allows full male fertilization success to be achieved under benign, competition-free conditions.
1999), our results provide some evidence of changes in body size that may be manifestations of inbreeding depression.
It is important for oyster breeding to manage genetic diversity, because high diversity is an indicator of future selective breeding potential and a reduced risk of inbreeding depression.
Although inbreeding depression was not included in the simulated model, it should not be a problem to see the effect of the OGC algorithm in this study.
KEY WORDS: southern bay scallop, Argopecten irradians concentricus, self-fertilized families, production traits, inbreeding depression
KEY WORDS: abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, inbreeding depression, maturity, survival, deformity
If productive or reproductive traits consequentially exhibit definite inbreeding depression, the sub-breed will increasingly depreciate and may fall into a vicious circle of reduction of population size and deleterious inbreeding effects.
The simplest approach to studying within-population inbreeding depression uses pedigree records of natural or controlled matings to unambiguously determine individual-level values of F relative to some reference generation and to ask if there is a relationship between individual-level F and fitness or its component traits, and this approach has been used in several studies of inbreeding in oysters (Beattie et al.
Most cultured aquatic species are only partially domesticated and highly fecund and are, therefore, expected to have higher genetic load and more severe inbreeding depression than species with lower fecundity and/or longer histories of domestication.
It is also known that life-stage specific difference in inbreeding depression are common and may depend on environmental, developmental or genetic factors (Husband & Schemske 1996).