incandescence


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Incandescence

The emission of visible radiation by a hot body. A theoretically perfect radiator, called a blackbody, will emit radiant energy according to Planck's radiation law at any temperature. Prediction of the visual brightness requires additional consideration of the sensitivity of the eye, and the radiation will be visible only for temperatures of the blackbody which are above some minimum. The relation between brightness and temperature is plotted in the illustration. As shown, the minimum tem-perature for incandescence for the dark-adapted eye is about 390°C (730°F). Under these ideal observing conditions, the incandescence appears as a colorless glow. The dull red light commonly associated with incandescence of objects in a lighted room requires a temperature of about 500°C (930°F). See Blackbody, Heat radiation

Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperatureenlarge picture
Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperature

incandescence

[‚in·kən′des·əns]
(optics)
The emission of visible radiation by a hot body.

incandescence

The emission of visible light as a result of heating.
References in periodicals archive ?
As described earlier, we attribute the bright emission that saturates the camera to soot incandescence.
Limelight was invented in the early 1800s by heating a block of quicklime to incandescence in a flame of acetylene.
Kirchhoff was guided by his research on the solar spectrum to admit that the Sun consists of a solid or liquid nucleus, brought to the highest incandescence and surrounded by a diaphanous atmosphere with a slightly inferior temperature.
Le metal en fusion, bien sur, est une lumiere epaisse, matiere qui produit elle-meme sa propre incandescence, a l'egal des soleils.
For the qualitative and quantitative spectral analysis of some materials brought to incandescence by technological methods, natural phenomena, incidents or accidents, the authors have thought, designed and made an unit portable optoelectronic structure supplied by electric energy by means of the USB source of portable computer, consisting of three optical channels as follows:
Despite the night being moon-bright, the slowly swaying ball of green incandescence was dazzling.
Fireworks produce colour through both incandescence and luminescence.
When people come to speak to me, whatever they say, I am struck by a kind of incandescence in them, the 'I' whose predicate can be 'love' or 'fear' or 'want'" (44), he says early on; and later, that "the best thing in life, [is] that little incandescence you see in people .
He ranks with Titian and Tintoretto as one of the great Venetian triumvirate of late Renaissance painters, particularly for his ability to convey colour and an extraordinary incandescence in his work.
THE light bulb is a source of electric light that works by incandescence, a general term for heatdriven light emissions.
Greg Egan's Incandescence is eminently representative of .