incarcerated hernia


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Related to incarcerated hernia: strangulated hernia

incarcerated hernia

[in′kär·sə‚rād·əd ′hər·nē·ə]
(medicine)
A hernia in which the intestinal loop is permanently trapped in the hernia sac.
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Meinke demonstrated that most appendiceal hernias presented with symptoms consistent with an incarcerated hernia, lacking the acute symptoms, such as nausea, anorexia, and periumbilical which aide in early diagnosis of appendicitis.
Strangulated hernias require emergency surgery, while incarcerated hernias need repair as soon as possible.
Symptoms of pain, abdominal distention, and vomiting suggest a bowel obstruction or an incarcerated hernia.
Sometimes the presenting features of an inflamed appendix may alert the surgeon to this possibility but it is a rarity and, is almost always misdiagnosed as an incarcerated hernia with diagnosis confirmed upon opening of the hernial sac.
Preoperative diagnosis is a challenge and mistaken with appendicitis, cholecystitis, diverticulitis, pancreatitis, epiploic appendagitis, incarcerated hernia, duodenal ulcer, ovarian torsion and ectopic pregnancy.
The abdominal radiograph will confirm a mechanical bowel obstruction and a thickened inguinal-scrotal fold (with or without bowel gas within the hemiscrotum) if incarcerated hernia is the etiology of the patient's symptoms.
Testicular torsion, incarcerated hernia, intussusception, Hirschsprung disease, appendici volvulus, bowel perforation.
Differential diagnosis of funiculitis, incarcerated hernia and the infected encysted hydrocele of the cord was made.
She reported no correlation between her pain and menses and was initially thought to have an incarcerated hernia with possible bowel strangulation.
Colonoscopy is a relatively safe procedure with well recognized complications of bleeding and perforation, moreover rare occurrences such as are splenic injury, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, incarcerated hernia, ileus and diverticulitis are described in the literature (1,2,4).
Other possible causes of an acute scrotum include torsion of a testicular appendage, epididymoorchitis, and incarcerated hernia.