inchoate

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inchoate

(of a legal document, promissory note, etc.) in an uncompleted state; not yet made specific or valid
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138) This representation operates, however inchoately, as a form of sexual regulation and that, in Crimp's view, is bad: homophobically bad.
After all, the EU has itself progressed from a form of transnational economic cooperation towards the current form of an inchoately constitutional supranational system.
experimentation is already taking place, if only inchoately and
21:2) inchoately manifest today in a "holy nation" that is the church (1 Peter 2:9).
But what ensued from these conflicts was a political deadlock within a state of apparent chaos, rather than the transformative process of democratisation which rising aspirations of many kinds had inchoately put on to the agenda.
Thereafter Martin depicts Hook's actions inchoately.
q Distortion is not only inevitable insofar as the writer writes with the whole personality, but it is also an effect of the mystery which already inchoately inheres in any created object.
They inchoately recognize that expanding government is a desideratum of the Creative Class, not of those left behind.
And even the MC tongue gets into the act in an inchoately Afro-suggestive form of attack.
According to most adherents of the Perennial Philosophy, this oneness is something human beings intuit or divine, or could, though most of us intuit it inchoately in a way that renders our intuition vulnerable to distortion by the self that does not know its true nature--by the unfree I, or ego.
In a short piece published in 1970, for example, he suggested that the hippy-inspired radical collectives were 'perhaps the focal centres of revolutionary energy in the present period' and claimed that Youth Culture as a whole prefigured, however inchoately, 'a joyous communist and classless society, freed of the trammels of hierarchy and domination, a society that would transcend the historic splits between town and country, individual and society, and mind and body' (Bookchin, 1970, pp.
A whole sea of troubles roils beneath the siblings' superficially polite relationship with their divorced and remarried mother (an incomparable Debra Winger), the tensions more inchoately acted out than specifically spelled out.