incision

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incision

1. a cut made with a knife during a surgical operation
2. any indentation in an incised leaf

incision

[in′sizh·ən]
(medicine)
A cut or wound of the body tissue, as an abdominal incision or a vertical or oblique incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Victoria Odita, 37, who developed incisional hernia in her infra umbilical region ( below the navel) owing to four Caesarean sections was rushed to the hospital emergency with her intestines hanging out of her body.
Following repeated complaints of abdominal swelling for four years, after her third delivery, she was told that a large incisional hernia was present in her infraumbilical region (situated below the navel).
An immediate operation was performed to repair the incisional hernia and alleviate the symptoms.
had a rred ersity Cork to bli d b k When we gotthey just ftoo highad Lon htahtcapAn" "An incisional hernia is common enough but a little boy who was a conjoined twin, and shared everything with his brother, wouldn't have the same anatomy or the same strength as another child.
The incidence of appendicitis occurring through incisional hernias is even more infrequent.
On postop days 1, 3, 7, and 28, patients rated postoperative incisional pain on a standard visual analog scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain).
Contract notice: Competition aimed at the conclusion of a three-year framework agreement for the supply of networks for containment abdominal incisional hernia and needed to hospitals hospital circle of varese, ospedale di circolo busto arsizio hospital sant~anna di como, the province of lecco, civil hospital of legnano and valtellina and valchiavenna.
Incisional Hernias C The third common type of hernia seen by Dr.
Costal cartilage is an additional option, but most patients prefer the reduced morbidity of an auricular graft and the advantage of a hidden incisional scar.
In this case, the most remarkable thing is that herniation does not occur through a natural orifice or an acquired defect, such as respectively for the Winslow foramen or for an incisional hernia, but directly into the abdominal wall.
Significant independent risk factors for incisional infections included high body mass index (odds ratio of 2.