inclined orbit


Also found in: Wikipedia.

inclined orbit

[in′klīnd ′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
A satellite orbit which is inclined with respect to the earth's equator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The uniqueness of Telesat's patent-pending dual-layer orbit is that polar orbit LEOs, crossing under the inclined orbit LEOs, increase the reliability and robustness of the network while reducing the number of satellites needed to achieve seamless global connectivity.
Along with the lack of a circular orbit, a highly inclined orbit of the exoplanet was predicted by calculations, and both those aspects were confirmed by measurements.
A massive planet on a large, elongated, highly inclined orbit could cause most of this tilt, pulling on the planets and making everything wobble like a big top over billions of years.
It has been operating in an inclined orbit for more than three years.
Scientists from Caltech report that this longstanding puzzle could be answered by the gravitational pull of a distant planet, with a mass five to 20 times that of Earth, in an eccentric and inclined orbit.
Capacity is offered from both stable and inclined orbit satellites, supplying providers with data speeds of hundreds of Mbps in each direction.
Options for the Hiltron HANT C-Ku downlink antenna include a satellite tracking system, inclined orbit tracking, integration of parabolic reflectors according to customer preference, a handheld control unit, de-icer, and a choice of standard steel mounts or non-penetrating mounts.
It has an eccentric and highly inclined orbit that takes it from 30 to 49 AU (4.
By using Newtec's FlexACM technology with inclined orbit satellites, Nynex is able to deliver robust connectivity at a significantly lower cost with unparalleled availability.
SDO's inclined orbit will form a figure-8 over the Earth during the day, giving us continuous, 24-hour-a-day sunlight for most of the year," said Philip Scherrer, a Stanford physics professor and principal investigator of the observatory's lead experiment, called the helioseismic magnetic imager.
BeiDou-2 (the second phase) supports regional operation from a network of geostationary, medium earth orbit and inclined orbit satellites.
Pallas's highly inclined orbit places it extremely far south of the ecliptic at this opposition, around declination -20[degrees] near Tau (3) ([[tau].