income

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income

1. the amount of monetary or other returns, either earned or unearned, accruing over a given period of time
2. receipts; revenue
References in classic literature ?
Am I to consider this as part of my income on account?
The unselfish girl devoted herself to me, shared in every interest, even the slightest, of my life, and managed so carefully and wisely that we lived in comfort on my narrow income.
His father's immense property, which alone yielded a yearly income of two hundred thousand, was left undivided between the brothers.
If that position was not a desperate one, it would be well worth his while to marry Miss Verinder for her income alone.
Rachel's income, which would have helped him to anything else, would not help him here; and Rachel had accordingly released herself, without encountering a moment's serious opposition on his part.
If she married, with a proper settlement--or, in other words, with the settlement I meant to make for her--the income from the estate (a good three thousand a year) would, during her lifetime, be at her own disposal.
So much for the landed property, and for the disposal of the income from it, on the occasion of Miss Fairlie's marriage.
The income would be at the wife's disposal, and the principal would go to her aunt or her cousin on her death.
My stipulation in regard to the twenty thousand pounds was simply this: The whole amount was to be settled so as to give the income to the lady for her life--afterwards to Sir Percival for his life-- and the principal to the children of the marriage.
The knowledge of Sir Percival's affairs which I had necessarily gained when the provisions of the deed on HIS side were submitted in due course to my examination, had but too plainly informed me that the debts on his estate were enormous, and that his income, though nominally a large one, was virtually, for a man in his position, next to nothing.
Stelling who had narrow intellects and large wants, and whose income, by a logical confusion to which Fortune, being a female as well as blindfold, is peculiarly liable, was proportioned not to their wants but to their intellect, with which income has clearly no inherent relation.
involvement in World War II became more certain, Congress dramatically increased the number of people paying income tax by (a) increasing the numbers of immigrants (b) raising incomes by mandating higher wages (c) requiring lower-income people to pay the tax (d) dropping the exemption from taxes formerly granted to people in certain critical professions.