incorrigible

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incorrigible

Philosophy (of a belief) having the property that whoever honestly believes it cannot be mistaken
References in periodicals archive ?
22) Hence capital punishment could not be maintained except by invoking less enormity of the crime itself than the monstrosity of the criminal, his incorrigibility, and the safeguard of society.
At Sydney, possibly reacting to the forcible loss of his family, Caesar proved his total incorrigibility by taking off into the bush for the third time in July 1794, plundering farms and huts on the margins of settlement.
Hence capital punishment could not be maintained except by invoking less the enormity of the crime itself than the monstrosity of the criminal, his incorrigibility, and the safeguard of society.
Program participants included juveniles who committed status offenses, such as truancy, tobacco or alcohol consumption, incorrigibility, curfew violation or crimes, such as drug or drug paraphernalia possession, shoplifting, assault, battery and other offenses.
He also pointed to the incorrigibility of our university faculties, so entranced with dismissing all existing categories and "undermining the fundamentals of all past understandings" that they were incapable of affirming anything at all.
America's public and private sectors are both largely predicated on the supposed incorrigibility of individual and group self-interest.
Born in New York City to Lamont Marvin, an advertising executive, and his fashion writer wife, Courtenay, the young Marvin was thrown out of dozens of schools for incorrigibility.
4) Therefore, failure to correct the truancy, runaway, and incorrigibility problem leads very predictably to more serious delinquent and sometimes violent behavior.
While the blame for such incorrigibility can be laid at many feet, the spirit of soixante-huitards is epitomised in Les Mots and Les Choses, a book by French philosopher Michel Foucault, the text of which seemed to justify all forms of transgression by promoting the notion that obedience is the posture of the victim.
The social phenomena that are examined closely are extramarital and youthful sexuality, the low status and abuse of women, the incorrigibility of island mores, the oppressive sanctimoniousness of village churchgoers (who are seldom blameless in their own lives yet trenchant in their criticisms of others' lives), and the pervasiveness of despair.
In this case, as in so many, you can find lots of blame to go around: You can slap on labels of incorrigibility and enact all sorts of trendy measures to condemn the kid and fine the parents.
Pointing out that the narrative attributes Arthur's incorrigibility to a weak, inferior nature inherent in his blackness, Williams notes that Arthur sets the foundation for the stereotype of the immoral, hypersexual black unable to control his prodigal lusts and vicious impulses.