incumbent

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incumbent

a person who holds an office, esp a clergyman holding a benefice

incumbent

[in′kəm·bənt]
(biology)
Lying on or down.
(geology)
Lying above, said of a stratum that is superimposed or overlies another stratum.
(ecology)
Referring to the occupation and utilization of resources to the exclusion of other species.

incumbent

An entity that is currently in power. An "incumbent company" is an organization that has been providing goods and services for some time. In politics, the "incumbent senator" is the person who currently holds that office. See ILEC.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty-four years after the restoration of democracy in 1990, there is remarkable stability in incumbency advantage in the Chilean Congress.
Other areas of the incumbency literature that are of particular interest examine the roles played by legislator tenure and legislator seniority.
County success in cobbling together initiatives such as Eugene's proposed revenue exchange with the county and a state takeover of some county services also could help restore the luster of Green's incumbency.
The current rules remove the incumbency advantage at least every eight years, and most legislators decline or fail to jump to the other house.
Along with Schwarzenegger, McPherson is also the only other Republican with the added benefit of incumbency and Poizner is running against Cruz Bustamante.
He received pounds 300 for an essay called A Ritualist Priest in Leeds: the Fifty- Two Year Incumbency of John Wylde at St Saviour's Church.
Incumbency in and of itself is a huge advantage, as we all know.
The predictive models built by economists generally begin by establishing the impacts on election outcomes of incumbency length of time in office, and party affiliation of the sitting president.
from raising the funds necessary to overcome the inherent incumbency advantage.
One only hopes that she can hang on to her incumbency long enough for another book or two.
Rossello governed for two four-year terms (1992-2000), and was personally popular, but his incumbency was marred by a series of corruption scandals involving key officials within his pro-statehood New Progressive Party (NPP).