incumbent


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incumbent

a person who holds an office, esp a clergyman holding a benefice

incumbent

[in′kəm·bənt]
(biology)
Lying on or down.
(geology)
Lying above, said of a stratum that is superimposed or overlies another stratum.
(ecology)
Referring to the occupation and utilization of resources to the exclusion of other species.

incumbent

An entity that is currently in power. An "incumbent company" is an organization that has been providing goods and services for some time. In politics, the "incumbent senator" is the person who currently holds that office. See ILEC.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incumbents Joel Bates and Timothy Poynton are facing a challenge from Ed Devault for the two, three-year seats.
14th Circuit State Attorney, where incumbent Glenn Hess faces Jim Appleman.
Incumbent Democrat Chris Edwards was leading Karen Bodner, 61 percent to 38 percent in Senate District 7, which includes north Eugene.
Challenger Jeffrey Storm was out in front over incumbent Gordon Dexter in the Palmdale Water District race.
On the national front there are longtime gay and lesbian incumbent candidates, first-timers vying to join the gay congressional contingent, and a couple of races between straight candidates that you may want to know about:
The Anglican Church of Canada has its first bishop of Asian descent--Canon Patrick Yu, the Hong Kong-born incumbent of St.
Elections that feature a sitting president tend to be referendums on the incumbent--and in recent elections, the incumbent has either won or lost by large electoral margins.
Ramirez all filed to oppose Granato, a two-term incumbent.
An investigation is conducted of the factors contributing to competitive reactions to entry by incumbent airlines both in the short and longer runs.
Given this voter consistency and the fact that most districts are not level playing fields, most elections are decided during the decennial redistricting (or "incumbent protection") process--that is, when Democrats and Republicans blatantly carve up the political map to protect incumbents, creating noncompetitive districts "safe" from changing parties.
Challenger Ance Johnson (2,500) defeated incumbent Edward Lively (2,077) and challenger Arthur Tyus (223).
find that incumbent spending reduces the number of votes they receive and Netter [1983