indigenous


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indigenous

[in′dij·ə·nəs]
(science and technology)
Existing and having originated naturally in a particular region or environment.

indigenous

Said of a plant or tree which is native to the area in which it is grown.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data from the 2016 Census shows the IPP is overseeing unprecedented growth in the Indigenous business sector.
However, Pakistani mainstream media fails to give substantive representation, coverage and information about indigenous people and their issues which, as a result, endangers the survival of very valuable information.
The combined expertise of the four scholars (three of whom have considerable experience in tertiary Indigenous studies) who have contributed to this text is evident in the insights they bring to their discussion and the breadth of scholarship they draw upon to make their case.
Indigenous ministry needs money to address a number of critical issues, she said, such as suicide prevention.
Indigenous scholarship is mired in discussions of identity, thus distracting from discussions of the possibilities of Indigenous knowledge(s) within the academy.
History repeated itself in 2016 when Hollywood actress Zoe Saldana announced a new documentary, Gone Missing, about Canada's disappeared and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
Indigenous inclusion in mainstream policy processes is a crucial component of Indigenous self-determination.
It was in these meetings conducted entirely in Cree that I began to learn and realize an Indigenous perspective of Treaty that is not learned in public schools and not understood by the general Canadian public.
The IUCN also passed a motion highlighting the importance of sacred natural sites long-conserved by indigenous communities.
He convincingly argues that establishing a park forwarded environmental concerns without addressing the question of Indigenous territorial authority.
Land seeks to support non-Indigenous people wishing to work in solidarity with Indigenous people, and to ease the burden of education from Indigenous activists for whom, as Gary Foley of the Gumbaynggirr Nation articulates in his foreword to the book, "some of the most difficult conversations are with people who have insisted they are supporters of the Aboriginal struggle, not opponents" (p.
In spite of these instruments, the right to education has not been fully realized for most indigenous peoples, and a critical education gap exists between indigenous peoples and the general population.