indulgence


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Related to indulgence: plenary indulgence

indulgence,

in the Roman Catholic Church, the pardon of temporal punishment due for sin. It is to be distinguished from absolution and the forgiveness of guilt. The church grants indulgences out of the Treasury of Merit won for the church by Christ and the saints. Indulgences may be plenary, i.e., a full remission of all temporal punishment; or they may be partial, i.e., a remission of part of the temporal punishment. Contrary to popular understanding, the number of days specified in a partial indulgence does not denote a reduction of time in purgatory. The practice of quantifying indulgences stems from ancient usage, when actual public penance was imposed and remitted for specified periods as the church saw fit. Hence, the penitent who is granted an indulgence receives merit as if he had performed actual penance for the length of time specified. The degree of merit varies with the disposition of the penitent. The notion that this practice encourages moral laxity is denied by the church, since the penitent must be in a state of grace and the attachment to even a single venial sin will reduce the effectiveness of the indulgence. Indulgences won for souls in purgatory are applied only as God wills. Martin LutherLuther, Martin,
1483–1546, German leader of the Protestant Reformation, b. Eisleben, Saxony, of a family of small, but free, landholders. Early Life and Spiritual Crisis

Luther was educated at the cathedral school at Eisenach and at the Univ.
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 protested against the sale and abuse of indulgences and came to reject the teaching altogether. Since the Council of Trent (1562) the buying and selling of indulgences has been unlawful.

Indulgence

 

in the Catholic Church, the complete or partial forgiveness of “sins” granted to the believer by the church, which according to its teachings possesses a supply of “divine grace” by virtue of the merits of Christ and the saints; also, the certificate handed out by the church on the occasion of “absolution.” In the 12th and 13th centuries the Catholic Church began a huge trade in indulgences that took on the character of shameless profit, a fact that later aroused the vociferous protest of the humanists; the abolition of the trade was one of the basic demands of the Reformation. Even today the sale of indulgences by the papacy has not ceased completely.

REFERENCES

Lozinskii, S. G. “Papskii ‘department pokaiannykh del.’” In Voprosy istorii religii i ateizma, collection 2. Moscow, 1954.
“Papskie taksy otpushcheniia grekhov.” Compiled by B. Ia. Ramm. Ibid.

indulgence

1. RC Church a remission of the temporal punishment for sin after its guilt has been forgiven
2. Commerce an extension of time granted as a favour for payment of a debt or as fulfilment of some other obligation
3. History a royal grant during the reigns of Charles II and James II of England giving Nonconformists and Roman Catholics a measure of religious freedom
References in classic literature ?
In a word, if a virtuous and self-denied character is dismissed with temporal wealth, greatness, rank, or the indulgence of such a rashly formed or ill assorted passion as that of Rebecca for Ivanhoe, the reader will be apt to say, verily Virtue has had its reward.
As Dantes spoke, Villefort gazed at his ingenuous and open countenance, and recollected the words of Renee, who, without knowing who the culprit was, had besought his indulgence for him.
If such be the case, I claim no further indulgence than should be conceded to every man whose object is to do good.
There was little time, however, for the indulgence of any images of merriment.
Your kind indulgence, first of all, monsieur," said Raoul, taking hold of his hand.
They missed the freedom, indulgence, and familiarity of the old French trading houses, and did not relish the sober exactness, reserve, and method of the new- comers.
Lady Elliot had been an excellent woman, sensible and amiable; whose judgement and conduct, if they might be pardoned the youthful infatuation which made her Lady Elliot, had never required indulgence afterwards.
Flexibility of mind, a disposition easily biassed by others, is an attribute which you know I am not very desirous of obtaining; nor has Frederica any claim to the indulgence of her notions at the expense of her mother's inclinations.
This indulgence, though not more than Catherine had hoped for, completed her conviction of being favoured beyond every other human creature, in friends and fortune, circumstance and chance.
In whatever city then the women are not under good regulations, we must look upon one half of it as not under the restraint of law, as it there happened; for the legislator, desiring to make his whole city a collection of warriors with respect to the men, he most evidently accomplished his design; but in the meantime the women were quite neglected, for they live without restraint in every improper indulgence and luxury.
I shall have occasion, when we meet to- morrow at Muswell Hill, to appeal to your indulgence under circumstances which may greatly astonish you.
Yet surely you might have gratified my ambition, from this single confidence, that I shall always prefer the indulgence of your inclinations to the satisfaction of my own.