inertial mass


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Related to inertial mass: gravitational mass

inertial mass

() See inertia; mass.

inertial mass

[i′nər·shəl ′mas]
(mechanics)
The mass of an object as determined by Newton's second law, in contrast to the mass as determined by the proportionality to the gravitational force.
References in periodicals archive ?
We assume the inertial mass of the microwave photons (whatever its absolute value) is affected by MiHsC, but instead of the horizon being the far-off and spherically symmetric Hubble horizon as before, the horizon is now made by the asymmetric walls of the cavity.
For example that the inertial mass of photons is finite and varies in line with MiHsC.
This force can be predicted to some extent using a new model for inertia that has been applied quite successfully to predict galaxy rotation and cosmic acceleration, and which assumes in this case that the inertial mass of photons is caused by Unruh radiation and these have to fit exactly between the cavity walls so that the inertial mass is greater at the wide end of the cavity.
2] where m is the inertial mass and v is the velocity.
We imagine that the amount of inertial mass of the electron ([m.
Then we propose that the inertial mass of the proton [m.
This has physicists puzzled, but it could be explained if gravitational mass was not the same as inertial mass, which is a paradigm in physics.
Most physicists disagree with this because they believe that gravitational mass exactly equals inertial mass," Lebed said.
But my point is that gravitational mass may not be equal to inertial mass due to some quantum effects in General Relativity, which is Einstein's theory of gravitation.
Einstein returned to the relation between inertial mass and energy in 1906 and in 1907 giving more general arguments for their complete equivalence, but he did not achieve the complete generality to which he inspired.
A particle such as the photon has no inertial mass since it is subjected to only absorption and emission, but not acceleration and deceleration.

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