inferior

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inferior

1. Botany (of a plant ovary) enclosed by and fused with the receptacle so that it is situated below the other floral parts
2. Astronomy
a. orbiting or occurring between the sun and the earth
b. lying below the horizon

inferior

[in′fir·ē·ər]
(biology)
The lower of two structures.
References in classic literature ?
The arms and ammunition of the Abyssinians are greatly inferior to ours, yet they are tremendously effective against the ill-armed barbarians of Europe.
Of his extreme arrogance and brutality to those who offended him there are numerous anecdotes; not least in the case of women, whom he, like most men of his age, regarded as man's inferiors.
Those who can barely live, and who live perforce in a very small, and generally very inferior, society, may well be illiberal and cross.
If in the supposition of his seeking to marry herself, his difficulties from his mother had seemed great, how much greater were they now likely to be, when the object of his engagement was undoubtedly inferior in connections, and probably inferior in fortune to herself.
A circumstance which greatly tended to enhance the tyranny of the nobility, and the sufferings of the inferior classes, arose from the consequences of the Conquest by Duke William of Normandy.
Their world is far gone in its cooling and this world is still crowded with life, but crowded only with what they regard as inferior animals.
2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces.
The voluptuous Tahitians are the only people who at all deserve to be compared with them; while the dark-haired Hawaiians and the woolly-headed Feejees are immeasurably inferior to them.
Day by day it varied in form, or rather its lower peaks, and the summits of others of the chain emerged above the clear horizon, and finally the inferior line of hills which connected most of them rose to view.
He considered the blessing of beauty as inferior only to the blessing of a baronetcy; and the Sir Walter Elliot, who united these gifts, was the constant object of his warmest respect and devotion.
Reginald has a good figure and is not unworthy the praise you have heard given him, but is still greatly inferior to our friend at Langford.
To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;