infiltration capacity

infiltration capacity

[‚in·fil′trā·shən kə′pas·əd·ē]
(hydrology)
The maximum rate at which water enters the soil or other porous material in a given condition.
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pst, land suitability) earthworks and reuse of materials, determination of the infiltration capacity of the subsoil, etc.
flow over the soil surface that occurs during rainstorms because the surface soil lacks sufficient infiltration capacity, is absent from the range of catchments from all over Australia reported on here: infiltration capacities greatly exceed rainfall intensity.
The impact energy can cause sealing in the superficial layer of uncovered soils, with consequent reduction in infiltration capacity and increase in surface runoff and its transport capacity (Sidiras & Rotjh, 1987).
1] rainfall intensities; however, the lower intensity might allow more time to destroy the protective layer and the improved infiltration capacity on grassed hillslope could enhance infiltration and delay runoff generation (Zhou et al.
This condition is maintained until the instantaneous rainfall intensity exceeds the soil infiltration capacity and the depressional storage at the soil surface starts.
Strategies for meeting the requirements in the Manual depend on a number of site factors, including infiltration capacity, available infrastructure, proposed development plans, and the drainage basin the proposed development is in.
Abstract: Infiltration capacity of soil mainly depends on two factors; the particle size and the moisture content of the soil.
The large fibrous shreds of yard waste compost were intended to form imperfections in the surface seal and maintain the porosity of the surface layer, resulting in greater infiltration capacity.
Runoff from the bare soil and pasture of plot II, plus rainfall, exceeded the infiltration capacity of the tree belt component so that runoff was generated from the whole plot II sequence.
Chemical additives including fertilizers and manures can change the physical characteristics of the soil, including the infiltration capacity.
Measurements were made of: (a) actual erosions, deposition and changes in surface roughness at over 100 pre-existing and new sites over periods of 1-9 years using the erosion bridge (microprofiler) technique; (b) infiltration capacity, overland flow, splash detachment and overland flow erosion at small (30 x 30 cm.
For many infiltration practices, the infiltration capacity of the soil can be exceeded, resulting in retained runoff slowly released into a storm sewer or watercourse.