infiltration capacity

infiltration capacity

[‚in·fil′trā·shən kə′pas·əd·ē]
(hydrology)
The maximum rate at which water enters the soil or other porous material in a given condition.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A significant amount of sediment has accumulated in the dry pond at the Sawgrass water treatment plant (777 Sawgrass Corporate Parkway, Sunrise FL 33325) and maintenance is required to remove the accumulated sediment and restore the water and sediment storage capacity as well as the infiltration capacity in the area near the inlet of the of the catch basins.
1] rainfall intensities; however, the lower intensity might allow more time to destroy the protective layer and the improved infiltration capacity on grassed hillslope could enhance infiltration and delay runoff generation (Zhou et al.
This condition is maintained until the instantaneous rainfall intensity exceeds the soil infiltration capacity and the depressional storage at the soil surface starts.
Strategies for meeting the requirements in the Manual depend on a number of site factors, including infiltration capacity, available infrastructure, proposed development plans, and the drainage basin the proposed development is in.
Runoff from the bare soil and pasture of plot II, plus rainfall, exceeded the infiltration capacity of the tree belt component so that runoff was generated from the whole plot II sequence.
Measurements were made of: (a) actual erosions, deposition and changes in surface roughness at over 100 pre-existing and new sites over periods of 1-9 years using the erosion bridge (microprofiler) technique; (b) infiltration capacity, overland flow, splash detachment and overland flow erosion at small (30 x 30 cm.
Increased infiltration rates, infiltration capacity and surface roughness exhibited by the forest floor greatly reduce the erosive energy of storm runoff.
Watershed characteristics include rainfall frequency, rate of runoff, ground slope, infiltration capacity of the soil, and the nature and type of soil.
Creek Stormwater Facility infiltration capacity is limited by a downstream restriction.
Horton RE (1941) An approach toward a physical interpretation of infiltration capacity.
At the end of the Goodger agronomic trial in 1999, 2 soil rehabilitation treatments, fertilised kikuyu plus deep ripping with direct drill (FKRDD), and fertilised kikuyu plus worms with direct drill (FKWDD), were compared with the continuously cropped and conventionally tilled (CCCT) treatment with regard to infiltration capacity and soil water storage.
To achieve this, a surface infiltration capacity must be maintained to capture storm water runoff then slowly drain it away.