Infix

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Infix

 

an affix, inserted within the stem in word formation or word inflection. The infix is an important means of affixation in the Indonesian languages, for example: in Tagalog s-um-ulat (“to write”) and s-in-ulat (“was written”) are derived from sulat (“writing”). The so-called nasal infix in Indo-European languages—in Latin, vic-i (“I conquered”) and vi-n-co (“I am conquering”)—is of a more debatable nature, since it does not have a definite meaning. Russian has alternations that originated in the Indo-European nasal infix: Russian lech’—liagu (“to lie”— “I’ll lie”) and sest’—siadu (“to sit”—“I’ll sit”) from Indo-European leg-ti—le-n-g-ō and sed-ti—se-n-d-ō.

References in periodicals archive ?
The number of cases of initial-oriented infixation is almost three times more common than the final-oriented infixation cases.
Some of the previous studies on the Germanic reflexes of reduplication include: Brugmann/Wood (1895) - ablaut theory, Lehmann (1952) - laryngeal explanation, van Coetsem (1956) - reverse analogy, Bech (1969) - infixation, Voyles (1980), Fulk (1987) - e-infix Vennemann (1994) - phonological explanation.
Internal, or infixing, reduplication is a common subtype both of reduplication and of infixation.
First, internal reduplication is always local, as in the Chamorro example in (53); we never see Koryak-style opposite edge copying with infixation.
Endowing the morphology with the ability to infix one stem inside another would make the pathological prediction that compounding, or incorporated nouns, or other stem-stem constructions could involve infixation as well.
A Natural History of Infixation, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
As Anne Pycha points out, expletive infixation in English is presumably a case of exactly this kind; however, expletive infixation lives on the margin between grammar and language games, and if the only cases of stem infixation belong to language play, they may thus constitute the exception that proves the rule--in this case the rule that morphology does not infix stems inside other stems.
infixation of -ecit-, or deletion of -o and suffixation of -ecito) is largely unimportant.
The theoretical approach known as prosodic morphology (McCarthy and Prince 1986, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1998, 1999)defends the hypothesis that prosodic information is available in some morphological processes like, for example, reduplication, infixation, and truncation.