sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
At necropsy, a poorly demarcated, 2 x 2 x 3-cm, firm, tan, friable, infiltrative mass was present in the preorbital diverticulum of the infraorbital sinus just left of midline, surrounded by a thick, yellow material (Fig 2).
Histopathologic examination of the infraorbital sinus (Fig 3) revealed a mass composed of polygonal cells with frequent arrangement into tubular and acinar cells, structures indicative of glandular differentiation.
Accessibility to the infraorbital sinus, where the tumor was located in this patient, is limited to an opening of less than 1 mm in most species, via the aperture sinus infraorbitalis.
On the second CT, the presence of a small amount of mineralization surrounded by attenuating material consistent with the presence of fluid or soft tissue in the infraorbital sinus was observed.
The differential diagnoses included infectious disease (mycobacteriosis, fungal or bacterial granuloma, poxvirus), hypovitaminosis A-induced abscess or granuloma involving the infraorbital sinus, foreign body reaction, trauma, and infiltrative neoplasia.
Caseous material had invaded the retrobulbar space of the right eye, the right commissure of the beak, and the preorbital diverticulum of the infraorbital sinus and a large cavity remained after debridement (Fig 3).
Sections of periorbital tissue, infraorbital sinus epithelium, trachea, lung, crop, kidney, and liver were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin, processed routinely, and sectioned at 5 [micro]m.