sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
12) In one study, discrete lesions within the infraorbital sinus could be detected by MRI in 7 out of 10 psittacine birds suffering from chronic sinusitis.
In one case report, an eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the infraorbital sinus also presented with fungal tracheitis, presumed to be secondary to inhalation of necrotic portions of the lesion.
Antemortem diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the infraorbital sinus in a psittacine bird is challenging.
The right infraorbital sinus contained a densely eosinophilic coagulum of inflammatory cells, sloughed epithelial cells, and necrotic debris (Fig 4).
7,14) Another characteristic feature of this form of neoplasia includes infiltrative cords of moderately undifferentiated to poorly differentiated squamous cells that frequently form central cores of laminated keratin (keratin pearls), as seen in the infraorbital sinus of this bird.
The avian infraorbital sinus is located ventromedial to the orbit and comprises numerous diverticula.