infringer


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infringer

Pronounced "in-fringe-er." Someone who violates the rights of an individual or organization. Anyone distributing copyrighted material without authorization is an infringer. See copyright.
References in periodicals archive ?
When you find yourself in the crosshairs of IP litigation as the alleged infringer, you must also do prep work.
Reverse Whois will now be available through the SAEGIS or SERION dashboard, offering Thomson Reuters CompuMark customers the ability to easily discover domains owned by suspected infringers.
usually, however, the infringer would have some record of sales and
It only makes sense to pursue an infringer that is generating millions of dollars a year in sales from the product that infringes your patent, or there will not be a large enough return - from an award from a trial or from an out-of-court settlement - to cover litigation expenses.
To recover lost profits, a patent owner needs to prove (1) demand for the patented invention, (2) no acceptable alternatives to the invention were available and (3) the patentee's capacity (marketing and manufacturing) to make the sales made by the infringer.
The copyright owner is entitled to recover the actual damages suffered by him or her as a result of the infringement, and any profits of the infringer that are attributable to the infringement and are not taken into account in computing the actual damages.
It remains the responsibility of the patent owner to identify infringers and enforce the patent.
A trade mark owner can defend a claim under section 21 by successfully proving that the alleged infringer has contravened its trade mark rights, therefore making the threat justified.
Any infringer must answer only to the patent owner and not to the non-exclusive licensees.
of another; (2) whether the infringer, when he knew of the other's
In addition to direct infringement referenced above, the law recognizes the principles of "contributory" and "vicarious" copyright infringement, which extend liability for copyright infringement to those people who either knowingly assist the direct infringer in their infringing activities or who have the ability to supervise the infringing activities in which they have a financial interest.
This is something that's been so overdue, because artists and publishers often can't afford to go after every infringer," he said.