inhalant

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inhalant

1. (esp of a volatile medicinal formulation) inhaled for its soothing or therapeutic effect
2. an inhalant medicinal formulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet inhalants often represent a young person's initial experience with psychoactive substances.
The LST program significantly reduced alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and inhalant use after one year for females, and the I-LST program significantly reduced smoking, binge drinking, and marijuana use for females.
Common inhalants are: household solvents--degreasers, dry cleaning products, gasoline, kerosene, paint thinners and removers, glue, marker liquids, correction liquids, some contact cleaner solutions; and household gases--whipped cream canisters or aerosols, butane lighters, propane tanks and butane lighters, fabric protector sprays, deodorant or hair sprays, spray paints (3).
In surveys conducted by the Brazilian Information Center on Psychotropic Drugs (CEBRID) in 1987, 1989, 1993 and 1997 with representative samples of adolescents enrolled at elementary and high schools in ten Brazilian state capitals, inhalants had the highest reported use (over 13% of the samples) (10).
Next to the bodies police found a nylon bag with an inhalant drug.
The Study: The 754 poly-substance abusers in this study were questioned concerning their use of inhalants.
Some of the common terms of inhalants are boppers, climax, gluey, hardware, head cleaner, locker room, moon gas, poor man's pot, poppers and snappers.
Under SBIRT, ask if the patient has drunk alcohol, smoked marijuana, or used any Other substance to get high including illicit drugs, over-the, counter preparations, prescription medications, inhalants, herbs, or plants.
However, among children and adolescents, inhalants constituted a major group of substances of abuse.
WASHINGTON -- Adults represent more than half of the patients admitted to substance abuse treatment programs for using inhalants, new data show.
The survey also showed that 32% of the adults who had treatment admissions involving inhalants were aged 30-44 years, and 16% were 45 and older.