inherent damping

inherent damping

[in′hir·ənt ′dam·piŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A method of vibration damping which makes use of the mechanical hysteresis of such materials as rubber, felt, and cork.
References in periodicals archive ?
In all cases, the inherent damping of sailplane structure was neglected.
Reduced aerodynamic damping does not necessarily represent a flutter problem, because the inherent damping of sailplane structure was neglected at current stage of investigation and the aerodynamic models used in analyses were not validated.
The steel frame estimated inherent damping of 1% meant unacceptable lateral accelerations.
The inherent damping effect of the WinDrive hydro-dynamic system reduces the mechanical shocks experienced during "low voltage ride through" and is based on the reliable Vorecon technology of Voith AG, a hydro-dynamically adjustable drive that has been extensively used in the gas turbine industry for many years.
This presentation deals with the elasticity and strength of rubber, its viscoelastic properties that cause rubber to have inherent damping, and the laboratory measurement and interpretation of tear strength, fatigue resistance and adhesion to wire cord.
Elastomers have been widely used in many areas of technology for achieving acoustic and vibration isolation and damping owing to a unique combination of low modulus and inherent damping (6).
Since the inherent damping in structural metals is very low, it is necessary to increase the damping of structures made from these materials by the use of appropriately designed damping systems.