inheritance


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to inheritance: polymorphism

inheritance,

in biology: see heredityheredity,
transmission from generation to generation through the process of reproduction in plants and animals of factors which cause the offspring to resemble their parents. That like begets like has been a maxim since ancient times.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

inheritance,

in law: see heirheir,
person designated by law to succeed to the ownership of property of another if that owner does not make a contrary disposition of it by will. A person who takes property left to him by will is not an heir but a legatee.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

inheritance

the transmission of rights to PROPERTY. It is usually distinguished from SUCCESSION by focusing the latter on the transmission of rights to a particular office or status. See also KINSHIP.

Inheritance

 

transfer of the property of a deceased person (decedent) to his heirs. A distinction is made between inheritance according to the statutes and under a will. Inheritance according to the statutes usually takes place if there is no will, and in such a case the property is inherited by the persons indicated by law. In the USSR there are two categories of statutory heirs. The first category consists of the children (including adopted children), spouse, and parents (including adoptive parents) of the deceased, as well as a child of the deceased born after his death. The second category includes the brothers and sisters of the deceased and his paternal and maternal grandparents. Heirs in the second category have a right to inherit only if there are no heirs in the first category, if the heirs in the first category do not accept the inheritance, or if all the heirs in the first category have been deprived by will of the right to inherit. Within each category all persons inherit equal shares. Statutory heirs are also disabled persons who were dependent on the deceased for at least one year before his death. Such persons inherit equally with the heirs of the category that receives the inheritance. In the absence of other heirs, the dependent persons inherit all the property of the deceased. Grandchildren and great-grandchildren are statutory heirs if at the time of the death of the decedent a parent who would have been an heir is no longer alive; they inherit equal portions of the statutory share that would have been inherited by their deceased parent.

Household goods and personal effects are inherited according to a special procedure: they pass to the statutory heirs who had been living with the deceased for at least one year before his death, regardless of their inheritance category or statutory share.

If there are no heirs, if none of the heirs accepts the inheritance, or if they have all been disinherited by the testator, the property passes to the state by right of inheritance. An heir who has accepted an inheritance is liable for the debts of the decedent within the limits of the value of the property which has passed to him.

V. A. KABATOV

inheritance

[in′her·əd·əns]
(computer science)
A feature of object-oriented programming that allows a new class to be defined simply by stating how it differs from an existing class.
(genetics)
The acquisition of characteristics by transmission of particular alleles from ancestor to descendant.
The sum total of characteristics dependent upon the constitution of the sperm-fertilized ovum.

inheritance

1. Law
a. hereditary succession to an estate, title, etc.
b. the right of an heir to succeed to property on the death of an ancestor
c. something that may legally be transmitted to an heir
2. the derivation of characteristics of one generation from an earlier one by heredity
3. Obsolete hereditary rights

inheritance

(programming, object-oriented)
In object-oriented programming, the ability to derive new classes from existing classes. A derived class (or "subclass") inherits the instance variables and methods of the "base class" (or "superclass"), and may add new instance variables and methods. New methods may be defined with the same names as those in the base class, in which case they override the original one.

For example, bytes might belong to the class of integers for which an add method might be defined. The byte class would inherit the add method from the integer class.

See also Liskov substitution principle, multiple inheritance.

inheritance

In object technology, the ability of one class of objects to inherit properties from a higher class.
References in classic literature ?
Frederick Fairlie's death: First, the use of three thousand a year (by his wife's permission, while she lived, and in his own right, on her death, if he survived her); and, secondly, the inheritance of Limmeridge for his son, if he had one.
This part of her inheritance was, in itself, a comfortable little fortune.
Why, I first told her the nature of our laws about marriage, and what the reasons were that men and women were obliged to enter into such compacts as it was neither in the power of one nor other to break; that otherwise, order and justice could not be maintained, and men would run from their wives, and abandon their children, mix confusedly with one another, and neither families be kept entire, nor inheritances be settled by legal descent.
WHILE inheritance tax was at one time the concern of very wealthy families and individuals, now it affects more and more people.
Islamabad -- According to a Gilani Research Foundation Survey carried out by Gallup Pakistan, 65% Pakistanis say that women in their households or in their acquaintances households get their share of inheritance according to their religious right.
JUST 300 estates in the Birmingham area paid inheritance tax in one year.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- How does Turkish inheritance law work?
Dubai: A large number of people of working age in the UAE are taking inheritance for granted, which prompts them to save less for retirement, according to a study by HSBC.
Inheritance may seem like the norm as more than four in five (84 per cent) working age people in the UAE, and more than three-quarters (74 per cent) globally, expect to leave their savings for their children.
SIGNIFICANT rises in the property market over recent years are pushing many people - perhaps unwittingly - into larger inheritance tax bills, according to wealth adviser Towry.
This refers to a letter about inheritance taxes in Spain.
In "Inheritances and the distribution of wealth or whatever happened to the great inheritance boom?