insectivorous plant


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Related to insectivorous plant: pitcher plant, Venus flytrap

insectivorous plant

[in‚sek′tiv·ə·rəs ′plant]
(botany)
A plant that captures and digests insects as a source of nutrients by using specialized leaves. Also known as carnivorous plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Swinburne's 'The Sundew' and Darwin's Insectivorous Plants.
William Emboden's delightful if not wholly reliable Bizarre Plants makes a point of emphasizing how Darwin's publication brought insectivorous plants to the attention of the public (127).
Insectivorous plants are hardly to be feared (unless you are a fly) but are remarkable examples of modified plant parts that result in increased adaptability to an otherwise inhospitable environment.
Insectivorous plants have leaves modified for insect entrapment and digestion to supplement nitrogen uptake.
The manner in which insectivorous plants capture their prey appears likewise in a certain respect as a planned action, although performed quite unconsciously.
Since Ireland has so much bog land, where such plants thrive, Glasnevin was a wonderful resource for Darwin when he was doing research for Insectivorous Plants (1875).
There, you can see a spectacular collection of bonsai, learn about the Trail of Evolution, and marvel at rare orchids and insectivorous plants.
Sundew, in fact, is the best known and most easily accessible of the carnivorous and insectivorous plants.
Allen refers to Swinburne's "The Sundew," originally published in The Spectator on July 26, 1862, but revised four years later for Poems and Ballads, and Charles Darwin's Insectivorous Plants (1875).
A cytochemical study of the leaf-gland enzymes of insectivorous plants of the genus Pinguicula.
These studies were documented in three books that Darwin wrote on researches that grew out of field observations he made near his home (Browne, 2002; Kohn, 2005): On the Various Contrivances by Which British and Foreign Orchids Are Fertilised by Insects, and on the Good Effects of Intercrossing; The Different Forms of Flowers on Plants of the Same Species; and Insectivorous Plants.
Smith Art Gall;ery and Museum, Stirling FLOW COUNTRY EXHIBITION: This exhibition is all about the peatlands of the Flow Country, which stretches through Caithness and Sutherland in the far north of Scotland and is the best blanket bog of its type in the world, a place of vast inspirational landscapes, an epic backdrop to fascinating and beautiful details, from soaring hen harriers to insectivorous plants.