insensitive time

insensitive time

[in′sen·sə·tiv ‚tīm]
(control systems)
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References in periodicals archive ?
IT does seem an especially insensitive time for the Children's Commissioner to speak out about the killing of James Bulger.
But in a statement Middlesbrough branch of Unison said whether justifiable or not, the huge increases in salary for Executive Directors had come at an inappropriate and insensitive time.
This is a very insensitive time to be bringing in a salary rise for those at the top.
this is a desperately insensitive time for her to be making those comments.
This seems like a very insensitive time for Lord Falconer to suggest that a Parliament which does the UK Government's bidding is the right place to make decisions on major developments in Wales.
He said: "I admit it was a very insensitive time to tell people but I am always straightforward and as honest as possible with the workforce.
This is a particularly insensitive time to impose a large price rise," said Brian Cooke, chairman of the Rail Passengers Council's Great Eastern sub-committee.
Avoiding the negation-by-race-and-class theme in the surface narrative of later novels such as Sanctuary (1927) may have allowed Faulkner to publish those novels in a much more racially insensitive time than ours.
It is a very insensitive time to talk of reforming the system because people are anxious enough as it is.
Rail passengers' spokesman Brian Cooke said: "This is a particularly insensitive time to impose a large price rise.
She said: "It is an insensitive time to make these comments and there seems to be a bandwagon effect now with companies moving call centres abroad.
The red-faced Fergie has a habit of losing his rag but, while he can get away with it in England, he has chosen the most insensitive time to exhibit his temper at such a high-profile event.