Insult

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Insult

 

under Soviet criminal law, the intentional lowering of a person’s honor and dignity, expressed in unseemly form. The insult may be given orally, in writing, by gestures, or by actions, and it may be given either publicly, in the presence of the victim, or not in his presence (in which case the insult is recognized as a crime only if the accused wanted his insulting statements to become known to the victim or knowingly permitted them to become known). Insult is punishable by corrective labor for a term not exceeding six months, by a fine of up to 50 rubles, by compelling the guilty person to rectify the harm done, or by public censure. If the act was of a minor nature, measures of social pressure may be applied, including turning the case over to a comrades’ court. Greater liability has been established for an insult in print or an insult committed by a person previously found guilty of insult (if the record of conviction has not been canceled). A criminal case involving insult is initiated only on the complaint of the victim (private accusation) and may be terminated if the parties make peace before the court retires to render judgment.

Soviet criminal law provides for increased liability for insulting a representative of the government or a representative of the public who is fulfilling duties for the protection of public order, a militiaman, or a people’s guard (for example, arts. 192 and 1921 of the Criminal Code of the RSFSR).

References in classic literature ?
They called her a little `blue' ragamuffin, father," said Harry, who ran in looking very angry; "but I have given it to them; they won't insult my sister again.
Why, thou wilt make it well-nigh impossible through not being a knight nor having any desire to be one, nor possessing the courage nor the will to avenge insults or defend thy lordship; for thou must know that in newly conquered kingdoms and provinces the minds of the inhabitants are never so quiet nor so well disposed to the new lord that there is no fear of their making some move to change matters once more, and try, as they say, what chance may do for them; so it is essential that the new possessor should have good sense to enable him to govern, and valour to attack and defend himself, whatever may befall him.
They came in swarms, and from above hurled down insults upon the victor.
Crimsworth, but I had never spoken to him, nor he to me, and I owed him a sort of involuntary grudge, because he had more than once been the tacit witness of insults offered by Edward to me.
On his arrival, as an indemnity for alleged insults offered to the flag of his country, he demanded some twenty or thirty thousand dollars to be placed in his hands forthwith, and in default of payment, threatened to land and take possession of the place.
If one is a man of self-respect," I went on, "one risks abuse by so doing, and is forced to put up with insults of every kind.
The expiring Lion said, "I have reluctantly brooked the insults of the brave, but to be compelled to endure such treatment from thee, a disgrace to Nature, is indeed to die a double death.
Could I ever have imagined that I should be doomed to bear such insults under my own roof - to hear such things spoken in my presence; nay, spoken to me and of me; and by those who arrogated to themselves the name of gentlemen?
There are insults, Avdotya Romanovna, which no goodwill can make us forget.
Besides," thinks I,"look at it once; why, the end of it --the foot part --what a small sort of end it is; whereas, if a broad footed farmer kicked me, there's a devilish broad insult.
She is not the girl to put up quietly with such an insult as this.
A truce with your raillery, Sir Knights,'' said Fitzurse; ``and it were well,'' he added, addressing the Prince, ``that your highness should assure the worthy Cedric there is no insult intended him by jests, which must sound but harshly in the ear of a stranger.