Integument

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integument

1. the protective layer around an ovule that becomes the seed coat
2. the outer protective layer or covering of an animal, such as skin or a cuticle

Integument

 

the part of the ovary on seed plants that encloses the nucellus (the central part of the ovary). The ovaries of a number of plants have one integument, while others, particularly in the monocotyledonous plants, have two. After fertilization the integument turns into a seed coat.


Integument

 

in animals, including man, the tissues that cover the body and perform protective, tactile, metabolic (including gas exchange), and excretory functions. The integument sometimes performs the function of feeding, associated with the complete reduction of the intestine in tapeworms, acanthocepha-lans, and Pogonophora. Thermoregulation is sometimes a function of the integument.

In most invertebrates the integument consists of cutaneous epithelium, or epidermis, which is of ectodermal origin. It includes a mesodermal connective-tissue layer, or derma, in such invertebrates as nemertines and cephalopod mollusks and in vertebrates, including man. Derivatives of the integument are cutaneous glands, cuticles, the chitinous armor of arthropods, the shells of mollusks, scales, feathers, hair, claws, and nails.

integument

[in′teg·yə·mənt]
(anatomy)
An outer covering, especially the skin, together with its various derivatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
tuberculata coccinea, from trochophore stage to torsion differs to that of other species because the formation of the larval retractor muscle, the integumental attachment, and the development of the foot mass occurred simultaneously in the present species.
20 19 Appearance of integumental attachment to larval shell.
Our objective was to determine whether viable DNA could be obtained by integumental swabbing from pimplebacks, Quadrula pustulosa (Lea, 1831) and to confirm mDNA sequence agreement among tissues obtained from swabbing and mantle-clipping from the same mussels.
In reconstructive plastic surgery, AlloDerm can be rolled, folded and shaped to repair or replace damaged or inadequate integumental tissue.
In a letter dated September 17, 1996, the FDA's Chief Mediator and Ombudsman in the Office of the Commissioner concluded that AlloDerm, intended for use for replacement or repair of damaged or inadequate integumental tissue, including gingival dermis, is banked human tissue within the meaning of the interim final rule (the FDA's regulation covering banked human tissue products).
The microcaching of the vitamin A and integumental separation by enclosing it in biopolymeric walls has overcome these problems.