intensive

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intensive

1. Business using one factor of production proportionately more than others, as specified
2. Physics of or relating to a local property, measurement, etc., that is independent of the extent of the system
References in periodicals archive ?
Intensiveness of the effect is on a par with the energy it produces.
Documentation Usage of the * Error free programs languages * Intensiveness of use of the language.
Although there are some drawbacks to this methodology, such as poor reproducibility, labor intensiveness, a slow and tedious procedure that can't be easily automated, and dependence of the results on the expertise of the analyst, it is still an essential component of proteomics for protein profiling.
But this limited presentation of examples does not allow schools to move up and down a continuum of intensiveness.
The labor intensiveness has remained despite the introduction of automated systems for different individual processes, reflecting that steps, such as sorting (eg, labeling and sorting slides for distribution to the pathologists), are time-consuming processes that cannot easily be automated.
If he is to achieve both ambitions will need to keep up this intensiveness of his training while studying for four A-levels, in maths, history, chemistry and biology.
The ranking of unskilled-skilled labour intensiveness is: traditional non-traded, traditional traded, manufacturing and R&D.
The situation may escalated, but intensiveness of violence and clashes lessened.
The functional activity of the central nervous system correlates with intensiveness of brain glucose metabolism (6-9).
However, in principal, the urban objects cannot get fully levelled because of the following reasons: functional differentiation of objects, the tractive forces of centres that alter the intensiveness of the architectural filling, etc.
Kak and Sushil (2004) described that flexibility can be achieved through knowledge intensiveness and more importance to human resources.
The usefulness of these examples of conducting experimental functional analysis in school settings has been evident in the outcomes produced, although issues related to time intensiveness, deviations from clinical protocols, involvement of paraprofessionals, etc.