interdict


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interdict

(ĭn`tərdĭkt), ecclesiastical censure notably used in the Roman Catholic Church, especially in the Middle Ages. When a parish, state, or nation is placed under the interdict no public church ceremony may take place, only certain sacraments, especially baptism, may be administered, and the dead may not receive Christian burial. The interdict is used to sway public opinion and to force action. A famous example was the interdict placed upon England during the reign of King JohnJohn,
1167–1216, king of England (1199–1216), son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Early Life

The king's youngest son, John was left out of Henry's original division of territory among his sons and was nicknamed John Lackland.
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 by Innocent IIIInnocent III,
b. 1160 or 1161, d. 1216, pope (1198–1216), an Italian, b. Anagni, named Lotario di Segni; successor of Celestine III. Innocent III was succeeded by Honorius III.
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 in 1208.

Interdict

 

a form of ecclesiastical pressure or punishment in the Catholic Church; a temporary ban placed by the pope (or sometimes by a bishop) on worship and religious ceremonies (excluding excommunication from the church) within a particular area (a local interdict). Sometimes it is placed on particular people and is known as a personal interdict. It was used widely in the 11th and 12th centuries (less frequently beginning with the 13th century) and was a powerful weapon in exerting pressure on sovereigns and feudal lords and in the war against heresy.lt has lost its former significance but still remains part of canon law.

interdict

1. RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2. Civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3. Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4. Roman history
a. an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
b. the procedure by which this order was sought
References in periodicals archive ?
A MILLIONAIRE metal tycoon has won an interdict against a neighbour over claims that he and his staff have been subjected to harassment.
A n o t h e r m easu r e being considered is that breaching an interdict should be made a criminal offence.
The use of biometric technology is an effective tool which will help increase maritime domain awareness through the positive identification of those we interdict.
What they seek to impose is nothing less than an interdict on points of view other than their own.
8 news release from the archdiocese announcing an impending interdict against the parish's lay board members.
4 Apart from an individuals's judgement about his worthiness to present himself to receive the Holy Eucharist, the minister of Holy Communion may find himself in the situation where he must refuse to distribute Holy Communion to someone, such as in cases of a declared excommunication, a declared interdict, or an obstinate persistence in manifest grave sin (cf.
CBP and FDA officials at mail and private carrier facilities inspect and interdict some packages that contain prescription drugs.
At the Court of Session in Edinburgh a judge granted Gavin Reekie, 89, from near Leuchars, in Fife, an interim interdict which bans wife Eileen from harming him.
It envisions partnerships of states working in concert, employing their national capabilities to develop a broad range of legal, diplomatic, economic, military and other tools to interdict threatening shipments of [weapons of mass destruction] .
and regional governments' efforts to detect and interdict illegal drug shipments heading north from the producing countries in South America.
We have observed this increase and we have increased our efforts to interdict the smuggling and this is the reason we interdicted the Russian tanker.
The contract was signed as Westinghouse Electric, a manufacturing company, withdrew its high court application to interdict Eskom.